Readius Cell Phone First to Incorporate Foldable EDisplay

first_img The Netherlands-based company has named the device “Readius,” and plans to sell the gadget starting in mid-2008. The price is not yet specified, but Polymer Vision´s chief executive Karl McGoldrick says it will be comparable to a high-end cell phone.The Readius´ e-paper screen displays text and images in black-and-white (16 greyscales) that look almost like they have been printed on paper. McGoldrick has also mentioned that Polymer Vision is planning to develop a cell phone with an 8-inch color display that can show video, which will hopefully be ready within five years.The Readius connects to the Internet through the third generation (3G) cell phone network, which offers ultra-fast data speeds, similar to WiFi for laptops. Users set up their e-mail accounts and favorite news sources, podcasts, and blog feeds from a PC, and then the data is automatically updated on the Readius. The device supports standard POP3 and IMAP for e-mail servers, and uses Micro SD High Capacity storage for quick and easy access to e-books and other information. The storage is flexible, with the first model providing up to 8GB.The Readius can also play MP3s and audio books. It has just 8 “SimpleTouch” buttons, and a keyboard may be added to future models. The battery life is up to six times longer than on other cell phones, offering 30 hours of continuous reading.”We are taking e-reading and bringing it to the mobile phone,” McGoldrick says. “You get the large display of e-reading, the super battery life of e-reading, and the high-end connectivity … and the form factor and weight of a mobile phone.”Polymer Vision hopes that the Readius will offer some competition for Apple´s iPhone and Amazon´s Kindle. The company is currently talking with retailers and mobile operators, and suggests that the device offers the chance for operators to make a profit from increased data storage.Polymer Vision has hinted at the coming of such a device for the past two years, which it claims “is generations ahead of anything else out there today.” Now, the company hopes that the mobile e-reader will be poised for an eventful summer.via: ReutersMore information: www.polymervision.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Readius´ e-paper display rolls out of a normal-sized cell phone. Image credit: Polymer Vision. Polymer Vision, a spin-off company from Philips, has recently announced the first cell phone to offer a roll-up e-display for reading your favorite Web sites. The 5-inch (13-cm)-diagonal display rolls out of a normal-sized phone when users wish to check their e-mail or read the news. Citation: ‘Readius’ Cell Phone First to Incorporate Foldable E-Display (2008, January 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-01-readius-cell-incorporate-foldable-e-display.htmllast_img read more

Windpowered car goes down wind faster than the wind

first_img More information: Thin Air Designs blog: www.fasterthanthewind.org/via Autopia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Wind-powered car goes down wind faster than the wind (2010, June 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-wind-powered-car-faster.html (PhysOrg.com) — A wind-powered car has been clocked in the US traveling down wind faster than the wind. In a recent run at New Jerusalem in Tracy, California, the car reached a top speed of more than 2.85 times faster than the wind blowing at the time (13.5 mph) powered by the wind itself. The run should now settle the DWFTTW (down wind faster than the wind) debate that has been raging for some time on the Internet about whether or not such a feat was possible. Explore further Smart wind turbines can predict the windcenter_img Cavallaro explained the car is able to move faster than the wind because the propeller is not turned by the wind. The wind pushes the vehicle forward, and once moving the wheels turn the propeller. The propeller spins in the opposite direction to that expected, pushing the wind backwards, which in turn pushes the car forwards, turning the wheels, and thus turning the propeller faster still.The vehicle was built after over a year of trials. Building a transmission able to transfer power from the wheels to the propeller was the most difficult part of the design. The next stage in development will be to have trials confirmed by NALSA. The Thin Air Designs car, called the Blackbird, was built by Rick Cavallaro, an aerodynamicist, paraglider and kitesurfer, who was alerted to the DWFTTW debate by his employer at Sportvision Inc., Stan Honey, a world-class sailing navigator. Cavallaro is chief scientist with the company. He made some calculations that convinced him the feat was possible and then built a model to prove it. When skeptics remained unconvinced, Cavallaro and a friend decided to build a full-size version.The “Faster than the Wind” team was able to attract sponsorship from wind turbine company Joby Energy and Google, and worked in collaboration with the aero department of the San Jose State University to build their ultra-light vehicle, which is made largely of foam. The car has a passing resemblance to a Formula 1 racing car, except for the five meter high propeller mounted on the back, and it is this propeller that holds the key to how it is possible for the car to travel down wind faster than the wind. An earlier version known as the BUFC for Big Ugly Cart (fill in the blank), also achieved speeds greater than the down wind speed at the North American Land Sailing Association (NALSA) meeting on a dry lakebed in Nevada in March. Image credit: Thin Air Designs © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

New project enables mobile phone use in areas with no reception

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Australian scientists have invented software that enables mobile (cell) phones to work in remote areas where there is no conventional coverage and in locations where the infrastructure has been destroyed through disaster, or is not economically viable. The technology enables ordinary mobile phones to make and receive calls without the need for phone towers or satellites. Director of the Research Centre for Disaster Resilience and Health at Flinders University, Professor Paul Arbon said the systems could prove invaluable in disasters, providing an instant network allowing people to call out and receive calls from concerned relatives, and helping volunteers to coordinate the response. The system could also provide the community with updates and warnings. The systems have been successfully tested in remote areas of the Flinders Ranges in South Australia where there is no mobile phone reception, with the three researchers creating a network over one square kilometer. The next stages in the project are to increase the range and improve sound quality. The team is also working on developing a method of dropping the temporary towers into disaster areas.Dr Gardner-Stephen said the system could be operational within 18 months provided the project receives adequate funding. He said his dream was for every mobile phone to be equipped with the system so that if there is a disaster all the phones in the region will automatically switch to the mesh network mode of operation as a fallback. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Verizon to allow Skype calls over wireless network More information: www.servalproject.org Paul Gardner-Stephen (left) talks with a colleague in the wilderness using his new system. Credit: Village Telcocenter_img Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: New project enables mobile phone use in areas with no reception (2010, July 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-07-enables-mobile-areas-reception.html Leader of the team, Dr Paul Gardner-Stephen of Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia, named the project the Serval Project, after an African wildcat renowned for its problem-solving abilities. The aim is to “provide fast, cheap, robust and effective telecommunications systems” for areas where there is currently no telephone infrastructure, or where it has been destroyed by natural disasters or civil unrest. The project includes two systems that can operate separately or be combined. One is specifically for disaster areas, and consists of a temporary, self-organizing and self-powered mobile phone network that operates via small phone towers dropped into the area by aircraft. The second system consists of a permanent mesh-based phone network between Wi-Fi enabled mobile phones, with no tower infrastructure required. Eventually, the system will also include the “Batphone,” which will be a specially designed phone able to operate on other unlicensed frequencies.The systems use open-source software developed by the team and dubbed Distributed Numbering Architecture (DNA). The software allows mobile phones to make calls out and receive calls on their existing numbers. The mesh network technology was developed by Village Telco and is integrated with the software to create a mesh network in which each phone acts as an independent router.Dr Gardner-Stephen said the device essentially “incorporates a compact version of a mobile phone tower into the phone itself.” It uses the Wi-Fi interface in modern Wi-Fi-enabled phones, carrying voice over it in such a way that it does not need to go back to a tower anywhere. The current range between phones is only a few hundred meters, which limits the usefulness of the system in remote areas, but Gardner-Stephen said adding small transmitters and more devices could expand the range considerably. The real benefit of the current system would be in disaster areas where there are plenty of phones but the towers are destroyed or the infrastructure is no longer functioning. In the recent Haiti disaster area for example, the mobile phone network was knocked out for over two days after the earthquake struck, and did not return to normal operation for a week.last_img read more

Arctic Whisper First fastcharging hybrid electric bus debuts in Sweden

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: Arctic Whisper – First fast-charging hybrid electric bus debuts in Sweden (2011, April 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-arctic-fast-charging-hybrid-electric.html The engineers from Opbrid took a unique path in developing the bus, which is based on technology originally developed for electric cars. Instead of just charging the bus overnight and trying to figure out how to keep it going for 18 hours, they opted instead for adding short bursts of charge at the beginning and/or ends of each bus route. The Arctic Whisper is fully charged every night, but is given periodic burst charges at the end of each run by means of a long-bar charging station. When the bus pulls into such a station, the driver flips a switch that raises the leads that lay atop the bus to meet the charging bar as it is lowered from above. The whole process takes as little as five minutes, and then the bus is on its way again and only works because of the specially designed very fast charging battery technology designed by Epyon power company.The charging stations don’t have to charge the bus all the way, just enough to keep it going for 18 hours of bus ridership. For longer routes or when unforeseen conditions arise, the bus is also equipped with a diesel generator to automatically charge the batteries en-route. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. At any rate, so far, it appears that riders, drivers and everyone else in Umea is quite happy with the initial results. Passengers don’t get jerked around during gear shifting since the bus doesn’t have gears, and they can ride in relative quiet. Drivers too, apparently are very happy to not have to shift gears all the time, reporting far less fatigue after a shift. And pedestrians and other drivers on the road report far less noise and pleasure at the sight of a commuter bus that isn’t belching burned diesel fumes. Explore furthercenter_img More information: www.opbrid.com/ Hybrid Bus in the City: A Prototype with a Future (PhysOrg.com) — The Spanish “green” technology firm, Opbrid, has delivered a new kind of diesel-electric hybrid commuter bus to the northern Swedish town of Umea for initial testing of its over-head fast charging vehicle, dubbed the “Arctic Whisper.” The name comes from the fact that it is almost silent as it makes its way around and the fact that onboard it’s so quiet, you can actually whisper to a fellow traveler. Executives at Opbrid are touting their new bus as the obvious solution to urban pollution problems, citing the fact that the bus produces zero emissions almost 100% of the time; and while this might be an accurate assessment for a bus that runs in Sweden, a country at the forefront of using alternative ways to produce electricity, the argument might not fly so easily in other countries who still rely very heavily on coal fired plants to produce most of their electricity to run such a vehicle as the Arctic Whisper.last_img read more

Researchers discover promising hydrogen storage material

first_img Copyright 2011 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. (PhysOrg.com) — If hydrogen is to ever to serve as an onboard energy carrier for the transportation industry, a material will be needed that can store large amounts of hydrogen at ambient temperature and pressure. So far, researchers have not found any material that can meet these requirements. But in a new study, a team from China and the US has taken a significant step toward this goal by identifying a material that can store hydrogen with a density as high as 4.6 wt. % (i.e., the hydrogen accounts for 4.6% of the total weight of the storage material), enabling it to meet the target of 4.3 wt. % set by the US department of Energy for 2010. More information: Kun Lü, et al. “Sc-phthalocyanine sheet: Promising material for hydrogen storage.” Applied Physics Letters 99, 163104 (2011). DOI:10.1063/1.3653465 Explore further Citation: Researchers discover promising hydrogen storage material (2011, November 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-hydrogen-storage-material.html Full to the brim with hydrogen: Porous form of magnesium borohydride can store hydrogen The researchers, led by Qiang Sun from Peking University in Beijing, China, and Virginia Commonwealth University in the Richmond, Virginia, US, have published their study in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.“Hydrogen storage is a big challenge for the hydrogen economy,” Sun told PhysOrg.com. “Currently the research is behind schedule, but with the advancement of materials design and synthesis, reaching the target for future transportation applications [is becoming] more and more promising.”As the researchers explained, the greatest difficulty in finding a sufficient hydrogen storage material for onboard storage systems lies in meeting multiple requirements with a single material. For example, in previous studies researchers have found that light metal hydrides can store hydrogen with a gravimetric density of 20 wt. %, but the material is not reversible, meaning it cannot be reused. Also, the hydrogen desorbs only at very high temperatures. In contrast, other materials such as carbon nanotubes and metal or covalent organic frameworks can store hydrogen reversibly, but the hydrogen adsorbs only at very low temperatures. The difference is due to bonding: in light metal hydrides, hydrogen is held in much stronger bonds than in the second group of materials. The researchers explain that, ideally, hydrogen should be bound with an intermediate binding energy.“If the bonding is too strong, hydrogen can only be released at high temperature, while if the bonding is too weak, the storage is unstable at room temperature,” Sun explained. “So we require an intermediate bonding energy.”In the current study, the researchers used modeling and simulations to investigate the performance of hydrogen storage in metal-containing porous sheets, which can be synthesized using the techniques previously proposed by two other groups (M. Abel, et al., and A. Sperl, et al.). In those techniques, porous sheets were made of blue-green dye units called phthalocyanines (Pc) with regularly spaced iron (Fe) atoms or other metal atoms. Due to their high dispersion, these metal sites in the porous substrates provide the possible adsorption sites for hydrogen molecules.“Transition metal atoms easily aggregate to form clusters,” Sun said. But materials in which metal atoms can be prevented from coalescing are scarce.The researchers systematically investigated 10 Pc-based porous sheets with transition metal atoms from scandium (Sc) through zinc (Zn), and found that porous Pc sheets with Sc atoms could store up to 4.6 wt. % hydrogen. In addition to the Sc atoms’ regular distribution in the Pc sheet, Sc has two other attractive features. First, it is lighter than other transition elements, allowing the overall storage material to be relatively light. Second, Sc atoms have a large size, so that they stick out and can capture more hydrogen molecules.By theoretically demonstrating that this Sc-Pc porous sheet can be used to create a hydrogen storage material with attractive properties, the researchers hope that the results will stimulate further analysis and experimental tests of the promising material. At a temperature of 298 K and pressure of 100 bar, the new hydrogen material can store hydrogen at a density of 4.6 wt. %. The inset shows the geometry of a Sc-Pc sheet. Image credit: Kun Lü, et al. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Scientists manipulate molecules inside living cells with temperature gradients

first_imgOne way that thermophoresis inside living cells can be used is to measure the binding affinities of molecules. As the scientists explain, the binding of a fluorescently marked molecule such as DNA or a protein leads to a change in the thermophoretic depletion strength. Binding affinities can reveal more detailed information about the interactions of these molecules.”The dream would be to record binding affinities in living cells, i.e., translating the award-winning microscale thermophoresis (MST) technique of our startup company Nanotemper into living cells,” Braun said. “However, the measurement protocol is not yet robust against the shape of the cell, so some more tricks to make it work will be necessary. But we are optimistic—experimental tricks are our specialty.” More information: Maren R. Reichl and Dieter Braun. “Thermophoretic Manipulation of Molecules inside Living Cells.” Journal of the American Chemical Society. DOI: 10.1021/ja506169b Now in a new paper, researchers have demonstrated for the first time that thermophoresis—the movement of molecules due to a temperature gradient rather than an electric field—can be used to measure the movement of DNA and other molecules inside living cells. The paper, by Maren R. Reichl and Dieter Braun at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, is published in a recent issue of The Journal of the American Chemical Society.”Our work shows that the measurement of thermophoresis in living cells is possible—moreover, in parallel across the cell and not at one single point,” Braun told Phys.org.In the new technique, a temperature gradient is applied across a cell by an infrared laser. Fluorescently marked molecules inside the cell move along this temperature gradient from hotter to colder regions. A camera can record this thermophoretic movement, with every camera pixel measuring thermophoresis simultaneously and independently. The technique can be performed in the natural environment of cells in vivo.The researchers demonstrated the use of thermophoresis measurements of DNA in the cytoplasm of living cells. Interestingly, the results revealed that DNA movement in the cytoplasm is slowed down, probably due to molecular crowding. In addition to measuring the movement of DNA, the thermophoresis technique could also measure the movement of proteins, pharmaceutical components, and other molecules in cells as long as they can move through the cytoplasm. Ribosomes, for example, are so large and bound to the endoplasmic reticulum that they cannot easily diffuse through the cytoplasm, making them poor candidates for thermophoresis. Journal information: Journal of the American Chemical Society Thermophoresis measurements of DNA and the dye molecule BCECF in the cytoplasm of living cells. Credit: Reichl and Braun. ©2014 American Chemical Society © 2014 Phys.org Researchers model how migration of DNA molecules is affected by charge, salt species, and salt concentrationcenter_img Citation: Scientists manipulate molecules inside living cells with temperature gradients (2014, September 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-09-scientists-molecules-cells-temperature-gradients.html (Phys.org) —The ability to make measurements of the biomolecular interactions that occur inside living cells is essential for understanding complex biological processes. But probing the inside of living cells without damaging them is a challenge. The cell membrane shields electrical fields, prohibiting the use of electrophoresis, a technique that is commonly used to analyze biological samples in a variety of areas outside living cells. Set-up of the thermophoresis technique. Heating is provided from below by an IR laser. The molecules move along the temperature gradient, indicated by arrows. Credit: Reichl and Braun. ©2014 American Chemical Society Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers build an array of light detectors on a photonic chip able

first_img Scientists have been hard at work trying to build a quantum computer for several years, and while the results have at times been promising, there is still clearly a long way to go. For such a computer to work, a quantum processor of some sort must be created. The current thinking is that such a processor will likely be photon based (because they are relatively easy to entangle and because they can be manipulated easier than other types of quantum bits) and it will have to be chip based. In this new effort, the researchers have created a process that allows for performing scalable integration of SNSPDs on several different kinds of photonic circuits.For a quantum computer based on photons to work, logic suggests, it will need to be able to detect and process single photons. SNSPDs are thought to be the most promising single photon detectors developed thus far, but, sadly, processes developed for building them have been plagued by a high numbers of defects. In this new effort, the researchers have developed a process that allows for building each detector separately, and putting only those that are defect-free onto an optical chip. The process also calls for building the optical chips separately using standard chip making fabrication techniques.The team reports that their process allows for building detector arrays that are larger and denser than those built before—and they are more sensitive as well. They proved their claims by building detectors capable of handling 20 percent of photons sent their way—ten times better than previous methods. Each was made on micron-sized membranes and those that passed testing, were transferred to a waveguide using an optical microscope.The team is continuing their research, now focusing on building larger on-chips systems with more capabilities. A large team of researchers with members from MIT, IBM, NASA’s JPL and Columbia University has developed a process that that enables scalable integration of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on a range of photonic circuits. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the team describes their new process and why they believe it may lead one day to a practical photonic quantum processor on a chip. Assembly of high-system-efficiency PIC with integrated detectors via membrane transfer. (a) Membrane transfer of an SNSPD onto a photonic waveguide. (b) Sketch of photonic chip with four waveguide-integrated detectors (A1, A2, B1 and B2). (c) Micrographs of sections I–VI labelled in b. Infrared light (red arrows) was coupled from a lensed fibre (I) with a spot diameter of 2.5 μm into a 2 × 3 μm polymer coupler (II). The coupler overlapped with a 50- to 500-nm-wide inverse-tapered section of a ​silicon waveguide (III). The input light travelled along the 500-nm-wide waveguide (IV) over a distance of 2 mm before reaching a 50:50 beam splitter (directional coupler in V) followed by the waveguide-integrated detectors (VI). The equivalent length of the scale bar (blue) is 3 μm. Credit: Nature Communications 6, Article number: 5873 doi:10.1038/ncomms6873 Explore further More information: On-chip detection of non-classical light by scalable integration of single-photon detectors, Nature Communications 6, Article number: 5873 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6873AbstractPhotonic-integrated circuits have emerged as a scalable platform for complex quantum systems. A central goal is to integrate single-photon detectors to reduce optical losses, latency and wiring complexity associated with off-chip detectors. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are particularly attractive because of high detection efficiency, sub-50-ps jitter and nanosecond-scale reset time. However, while single detectors have been incorporated into individual waveguides, the system detection efficiency of multiple SNSPDs in one photonic circuit—required for scalable quantum photonic circuits—has been limited to <0.2%. Here we introduce a micrometer-scale flip-chip process that enables scalable integration of SNSPDs on a range of photonic circuits. Ten low-jitter detectors are integrated on one circuit with 100% device yield. With an average system detection efficiency beyond 10%, and estimated on-chip detection efficiency of 14–52% for four detectors operated simultaneously, we demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first on-chip photon correlation measurements of non-classical light.via Nanotechweb Journal information: Nature Communicationscenter_img © 2015 Phys.org Packing single-photon detectors on an optical chip to create quantum-computational circuits This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Researchers build an array of light detectors on a photonic chip able to record single photons (2015, January 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-01-array-detectors-photonic-chip-photons.htmllast_img read more

We are about feel good music

first_imgSantana seems to have given Delhi a taste for rock for sure. And now Delhiites will get a chance to listen to Five 8 — a glam / Progressive Rock band from the city. The band has Robin Mathew on vocals, Aveleon Vaz on drums, Pranav on guitars, Steve Peter on bass and Shiv Ahuja on keyboards. Millennium Post caught up with the band members before their performance. Here are excerpts from an interview:How did all of you get together? We were all a part of the Kirori Mal College Music Society where the band was initially formed in 2005. But it was only in 2007 that we started playing our own music in the Delhi University circuit. After graduating, we started doing gigs in pubs. Our band was started with the idea of performing our own music and of course we also did a few covers. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’How would you define your music?Essentially it is pop funk as a genre. Our music is all about feel good music. It is hip,  happy, funky. Overall, it is about having a good time.What will you be performing today? E.P. and some of our new compositions. This time we have also roped in Pranav for guitars in place of our official guitarist, who is studying music in Chennai.What is the USP of your band?The fact that our sound is ever evolving. We keep innovating our songs and also rework our older numbers. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixWhy Five 8?Actually, Five 8 is a musical term, a time signature. It was once during a competition that our drummer randomly played the Five 8 and we are kind of stuck with it ever since. It is just that we never decided to change it since.Who composes the music? Also what story does it tell? Most of our lyrics is written by Robin Mathew, our vocalist and the drummer Aveleon Vaz. But all of us contribute to the lyrics. Earlier, we wrote on everything under the sun. But over time, we started focusing on our surroundings and added critical commentary about the society. Tell us one thing your band is completely addicted to…Food. We draw our inspiration when we hang out together and food is one factor we cannot do without. When we jam we go to our drummer Aveleon’s house where his parents are quite supportive. He is a Goan and his mother cooks us a lot of Goan dishes.What next?More gigs. This time of the year is really busy so probably more gigs. Also as a band, we do not have high and lofty ideas of conquering the world music, but this is not to say we are not serious. We take music very seriously but for us it is all about having a quality time jamming and creating good music. DETAILAt: Hard Rock Cafe, DLF Place, Saket When: 15 NovemberTimings: 9 pm onwards Phone: 47158888last_img read more

Life saving drugs still a distant dream

first_imgThough, Union Health Minister JP Nadda has hailed the budget as balanced, progressive, pragmatic and pro-people, various stakeholders have raised their reservations over the budgetary allocation for the heath care sector. Talking to Millennium Post, JNU Professor Ritu Priya said: “The budget is not in the best interest of poor. The government had promised to provide at least 50 life saving drugs for free, which cannot be accomplished with this small amount of the Budget.” Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJI“The Health Ministry had demanded a minimum Rs 50,000 crore from the Finance Ministry to expedite primary health care treatment plans for the poor. Now, how the Health Minister will fulfill those promises?” asked the NJU professor, who is associated with Centre for Social Medicine and Community Health (CSMCH) department. It’s worth mentioning that the Health Ministry and CSMCH work in tandem over policy formulations for public health care.Notably, the present allocation is Rs 2011 crore lesser than the last year’s final outlay which was Rs 35,163 crore after cutting down from the total Rs 39,237 crore announced in the Budget 2014-15. “I have allocated Rs 33,152 crore to the health sector. I urge states to utilise their enhanced resources effectively in these areas,” Jaitley said while presenting the Union Budget in the Lok Sabha.As an initiative to boost the public health sector in the country, the government has also decided to set up six new AIIMS-like institutes in Jammu and Kashmir, Punjab, Tamil Nadu, Himachal Pradesh, Assam and Bihar.last_img read more

No social media for Kate Winslet her children

first_imgShe is starring in the upcoming film about Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, but Oscar-winning actor Kate Winslet says she is not good with technology.The 40-year-old actor is mother to a 15-year-old daughter, an 11-year-old son and her youngest son will turn two in December, reported BBC online.“I’m terrible. I am the least techie person you will ever meet, I’m rubbish. “We’re not a big deviced-up household. We don’t have any social media, nothing like that,” she said.Asked if she is strict with her children about how much they can use technology, Winslet said, “Not strict. But you have to have rules I think and we certainly have those, yes.”last_img