Nigeria can progress at World Cup – Pinnick

first_imgThe President of Nigeria Football Federation (NFF), Amaju Melvin Pinnick, is certain that the national side have the potential to advance past the group stages of the World Cup, despite losing their opening game to Croatia 2-0The Super Eagles were left unable to answer to Croatia’s set-pieces at Kaliningrad on Saturday as they fell to a disappointing 2-0 loss and are now bottom of Group D after both Argentina and Iceland drew in their opening game.“We expected to win against Croatia but it did not happen and the whole team, as well as the Federation, have put that behind us and looking ahead with hope to the next two matches,” said Pinnick, according to AllAfrica.“I have spoken with the Coach and the players and they have confidence that the job can be done. They feel bad to have lost the first match and are determined to go out there and do what they have to do against Iceland on Friday.”News: Samson Siasia banned for life by FIFA George Patchias – August 16, 2019 The former manager of the Nigerian national team Samson Siasia has been banned from football for life.A match-fixing investigation has been carried out by…The President remains hopeful that Nigeria can bounce back as in football nothing is impossible.“Losing your first match of a major competition is not an automatic exit ticket. Spain lost their first match of the 2010 FIFA World Cup finals and still went ahead to win the tournament.“We have a young team that can achieve so much with the right attitude and invention, and we must now reach deep down for those qualities when we play Iceland in Volgograd.”Nigeria will face World Cup debutants Iceland at the Volgograd Arena on Friday.last_img read more

Move to Automated Exchange of Information Causing Issues for Financial Services Practitioners

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Bahamas, September 18th, 2017 – Nassau – The DPM was Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance the Hon. Peter Turnquest said among the issues financial services practitioners are contending with is the move to automatic exchange of information, particularly for matters related to taxation in other jurisdictions.The initial standard in this regard was the Exchange of Information on Request, espoused by the OECD-hosted Global Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes, DPM Turnquest said at the Securities Industry Act, 2011 and Investment Funds Act, 2003 Annual Briefing hosted by the Securities Commission of The Bahamas at the British Colonial Hilton, Thursday, September 14, 2017.He said The Bahamas implemented a number of key legislative initiatives to ensure the legal and regulatory framework as well as supporting processes and procedures were in place to satisfy the Exchange of Information on Request standard.“These involved, among other things, ensuring reliable accounting records were maintained and accessible, and that the beneficial owners of entities, structures and legal arrangements were identified and properly maintained.“The legislative initiatives included the International Tax Cooperation Act, 2010, which facilitated the implementation of international tax agreements and tax information sharing under those agreements.   The Government also implemented a series of legislative amendments including amendments to the International Business Companies (IBC) Act, the Partnership Limited Liability Act and the Segregated Companies Act, amongst others, in 2011, and the IBC Accounting Records Order of 2016, to meet the information exchange standards.   After having undergone the Global Forum’s most recent review – the Phase 2 review, the jurisdiction is assessed as Largely Compliant.”The DPM said the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act or FATCA was adopted by the United States Congress in 2010, and of course, The Bahamas made the necessary legislative and procedural changes to meet the FATCA requirements.He explained that by September 2014, the G20 and leaders of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development had endorsed the Common Reporting Standard or CRS.The CRS facilitates automatic exchange of account information, on a confidential basis with information from financial institutions being exchanged annually.   According to an OECD June 2017 report, some 101 jurisdictions had committed to implementing this newest standard on tax transparency and undertaking actual information exchanges by 2017 or 2018.“You would be aware that the Government is committed to adopting the multilateral approach to sharing information under the CRS regime.   We simply cannot afford, nor do we wish to have, the reputation of being the ‘last tax haven standing’ as the Head of the OECD’s Global Forum Secretariat on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes, Monica Bhatia, referred to the jurisdiction prior to the Government’s commitment to the Multi-lateral approach.”DPM Turnquest said, “We must protect our sector from the fallout of blacklisting, and we want to be singled out for markers such as excellence in service, being business friendly, and product innovation–not for being a place to hide or launder illicit funds of any kind.   Undoubtedly, this will impact reporting requirements and hence compliance costs in most, if not all, financial institutions.”PressRelease: BIS The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provocenter_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Recommended for youlast_img read more

Pass the wine metal mouth The whole tooth about wearing adult braces

first_img3:03 I’m 51 years old, and I wear braces. Some days, I almost forget I have them on. Other times, when I’m doing something outwardly grown-up, like buying wine or meeting with my daughter’s fifth-grade teacher, I’m achingly aware that my teeth are sporting accessories usually seen on kids who don’t remember a time before YouTube.But I’m not alone. The American Association of Orthodontists reports that as of 2016, 28 percent of the patients being treated by its members are over 18. That’s more than 1.6 million people. And I can tell you from experience that many of them have probably wondered at least once if they’re too old for this.I’ve been down this metal-mouthed road before. The first time I had braces, I was 13 years old, it was the 1980s and, unlike today, braces didn’t even attempt to disguise what they were.Back then, braces were silver, they couldn’t be hidden, and it seemed like orthodontists weren’t even trying. There were none of these clear brackets, or see-through, removable aligners, or rainbow-colored elastic bands to match your school colors. No one thought to put braces on the back of your teeth. Get real, kid.I didn’t even go to an orthodontist for my first set of braces. My regular dentist told my mother he could handle it himself. I’m not sure that’s a choice an informed patient would make today. But again, 1980s.With my 9-year-old daughter, Kelly, on a bullet train in Japan just weeks after I got braces. Of the two of us, Kelly would seem the more appropriate age for orthodontics, but I’ve since learned that “appropriate” is relative. Gael Fashingbauer Cooper My teenage braces did their job. My teeth look fairly straight in my college photos and my wedding album. But I never had a retainer or any follow-up treatment. I mentally put braces in the past, with acne and algebra, and moved on.But as the years went by, I noticed what I called an “overbite” and what I later learned was really an “overjet.” In an overbite, the upper teeth overlap the lower. In an overjet, the teeth kind of lean forward. No one ever called it out to me — thank you friends for not being jerks — but in this age of social media, I began to hate selfies, to wonder why smiling didn’t come naturally to me, and to stare at my friends’ dazzling Facebook grins with envy.It’s embarrassing to write this, but I saw my overjet as a personal failure, on par with getting a cavity for not brushing. Somehow in my head, admitting that I needed orthodontic treatment was like admitting I messed up. It sounds stupid when I write it down — it’s not like I caused it by yanking my teeth apart with a crowbar — but there it is. I still remember how tears caught in my throat over a decade ago, the first time I asked a dentist for an orthodontist referral. Comments And as promised, the braces are working. With 20 months down and about four to go, I can see that the overjet has shrunk to nearly nothing. The gaps where the extracted teeth once were have filled in. And I notice surprising changes every day. My lips now make more of a model-esque Cupid’s bow, something I used to envy in Facebook photos of others. Both edges of my smile rise up evenly now. I’m slowly acquiring the look I envied in those photogenic friends, even if only I notice it.Dr. Brent Larson, the president of the American Association of Orthodontists, and Dr. Lee Graber, secretary-general of the World Federation of Orthodontics, patiently took me through the changes in braces technology over the years, and answered all my questions about adult orthodontics.”As long as you’re alive, teeth can move,” Dr. Larson said.Dr. Graber told me his oldest orthodontics patient was 88, was delighted with his braces, and is now “still going strong into his 90s.”But it wasn’t the technology changes that finally made me decide to get braces at 50. I had to cross a mental line that I honestly didn’t think I could ever get myself over. And maybe you have your own mental line. It might not be braces, but it’s some kind of risk that for whatever reason, is important to you. Maybe it doesn’t matter to anyone else, but you think about it all the time, and wonder if you can ever force yourself to make it happen.bracesoldnewThe braces on the left date to 1929, and feature actual gold bands on the top teeth. They’re a heck of a lot less subtle than the modern braces on the right, which like mine, feature translucent brackets. Even the wires are impressive: They’re heat-activated nickel-titanium wires developed with help from NASA. American Association of Orthodontists I read recently that Warren Buffett, the Nebraska billionaire, reportedly has three boxes on his desk — IN, OUT and TOO HARD. Who can’t relate to that? I mentally put “braces” in my TOO HARD box for years and years.Not all life improvements are doable. Money prevents us from some. Family or job responsibilities eliminate others. But somewhere in your mental TOO HARD box, there might be a big dream you can actually accomplish.When people would write in to Dear Abby and say they dreamed of going back to college, but worried that they’d be however-many years old when they graduated, they’d get the blunt response: “How old would you be by then if you didn’t get your degree?”The point was clear: You can keep growing and changing and improving yourself as you age, or you can get older and always regret never taking the plunge.If you need to point to someone who discovered that it wasn’t too late to make a major change in her life, you can point to me.I’m 51 years old, and I wear braces. Share your voice Tags Top 5 foods I’ll devour after braces 2 Culture Wellness Now playing: Watch this: I still remember how tears caught in my throat over a decade ago, the first time I asked a dentist for an orthodontist referral. I kept that little green card for probably a year — the hygienist had casually scribbled on it, “severe overbite.” My teeth weren’t causing me any physical issues, but that one word, “severe,” made me think I was a lost cause. It didn’t help that she also cheerily remarked that an orthodontist would probably have to break my jaw to treat my teeth. What? Am I torture-victim Theon in Game of Thrones? Eventually, I threw the card away and tried not to think about it.You know how you can set email reminders to pop up regularly, daily or weekly or whatever? For about three years, I had a reminder that popped up every Wednesday that just said “call about ortho.” And like a tired kid punching the snooze alarm, I slammed it shut and did nothing. I slept on it for literally years. Zzzzz…soph-1I can’t believe my boss made me share this photo, but here I am in 1982, the first time I had braces. The brackets were not see-through and subtle like brackets are today.  Gael Fashingbauer Cooper It was my husband, who also had braces in the 1980s, who actually woke me up. His top teeth are an orthodontist’s dream, but a few bottom teeth are now crooked. They bothered him, but rather than ignore the issue for a decade like I did, he decided to take action immediately, simply walking into an orthodontist’s office and signing up for a consultation.He convinced me to make an appointment, and I was blown away by how different the experience was from what I had dreaded. The staff was exceptionally friendly, the office was clean, crisp and high-tech, the treatment methods today were as different from those of the 1980s as dial-up internet is from broadband. Brackets are now clear, X-rays are digital, appliances are smaller and more comfortable.But at nearly 50, was I just too old for braces?My treatment wasn’t going to be easy. I couldn’t get away with clear aligners such as Invisalign, my teeth needed more. But that early hygienist had been wrong: No one would need to break my jaw.I did need two teeth extracted to make room for the teeth to move, and believe me, that was the worst part of this experience that’s now going on two years. The teeth were healthy, solid adult teeth that did not want to be evicted, and having them pulled was one of the most unnatural and disturbing experiences I can remember.”That was among the top 10 toughest extractions of my career,” my dentist later told me. You and me both, sister.After the extractions healed, on went the braces. My new orthodontist installed clear brackets, a huge improvement on the silver ones I had as a kid. The clunky silver wire that helped give old-school braces their train-tracks nickname is still there, yes. But in some photos, it’s not clear on first glance I have anything on my teeth at all.iyaz-jpgEnlarge ImageI’m not the only one at CNET who’s worn braces as an adult. Here’s Iyaz Akhtar showing off his shiny smile at Google headquarters in 2018. He’s since had his braces removed. Iyaz Akhtar This path to a better smile ain’t cheap. A spokesperson for the American Association of Orthodontists said that while her group doesn’t collect information on average costs, the American Dental Association does. In a 2016 survey, that group reported that fees for comprehensive treatment of adolescents ranged from $4,978 to $6,900, and that the range for adults was slightly higher, ranging from $5,100 to $7,045.I had to squeeze my savings to come up with a decent down payment, and there’s a monthly bill similar to a car payment. My dental insurance doesn’t cover any of it, and sometimes, it’s a scramble to pay.Plus, braces require more constant upkeep than I’d have given them as a teen.I can’t eat certain things, from the obvious (caramels or corn on the cob) to the surprising (certain cereals and even rice are a horror to floss out). Cleaning my teeth requires special disposable flossers that I buy online. Brackets pop loose. Wires poke me. Monthly appointments to tighten the braces leave me popping Advil and eating soup. As a teen, I probably would’ve dramatically thrown myself on the bed and demanded to know why my parents were putting me through this.But I’m 51 now, and my sense of what’s painful in life has been tempered by real experiences. I’ve lost loved ones. I’ve worried over biopsies. Two years of dental inconvenience doesn’t make my own top 10 list of life hardships, or maybe even my top 100.last_img read more

Cooks Resilience Leads To Shot on NBAs Biggest Stage

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, Special to the AFRO, mgray@afro.comGolden State Warriors guard Quinn Cook has already become something of a legend in Prince George’s County.  There is a story that he caught the eye of a prominent former college basketball coach as a freshman at DeMatha, who knew he would be a can’t miss, NBA prodigy.The parent of an upperclassmen, who didn’t want to be identified, was investing in his son’s development with a private trainer as he thought his son was a major college prospect heading into his senior year.  The former coach supposedly told the father, “Your son can play mid-major college basketball, but that youngster is going to the NBA.”D.M.V. native Quinn Cook, who instantly became a legend and phenom when he began playing at DeMatha in Hyattsville, is now one of the players keeping the Golden State Warriors alive in the NBA Finals. (Courtesy Photo)That youngster with the greater upside proved to be Cook.He took a circuitous route to the Association and may never become the star that his teammate Kevin Durant is; however, when it comes to being a legend of the P.G. hardwood there is no doubt.  Cook was “a bad man” which is the highest praise that a basketball player can get from peers.Freshmen who play at DeMatha normally have to wait their turn to get minutes, but Cook took his and never looked back.  He was able to earn his playing time on a team loaded with talent, not only because of his skill, but because of his personality.“He has always been good with people,” Ron Bailey, owner of I-95ballerz.com, a local website and blog that covers amateur basketball in the D.M.V. area told the AFRO.  “Stars have always liked being around and playing with him.”However, that never diminished the fact that his confidence in himself was ever lacking.  Despite being what would be considered an undersized guard by today’s standards, Cook was never a player that would back down from a challenge.  Whether it was at Dematha, while playing in the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference, or at Duke University when he played for a team that would ultimately win a national championship, Cook would find a way to make plays that would help his team win.“He played with a moxy from the first time he stepped on the court and played bigger than his size,” Bailey said.  “He’s a guy that figured out how to put the ball in the basket and faced up to every challenge.”Cook’s three year run at Dematha was one of the great eras in the rich history of their basketball program. The Stags were 85-18 during that stretch and were ranked number one after his junior year.  That season he earned all-Met honors from the Washington Post and was the first underclassmen in three decades to earn that award.However, there were still doubts about his size and whether he could really play major college basketball.  Cook vindicated himself after transferring to Oak Hill Academy for his senior year. Oak Hill gave him another stage to prove himself, while playing with phenomenal talent that he would ultimately blend with.  He led the Oak Hill Warriors to a 31-4 record, averaging 19.1 ppg, 10.9 apg and 2.5 steals.Cook worked hard to find his niche at Duke before and didn’t play starter’s minutes until he was a senior. He was a co-captain for a team that won a national championship, yet he wasn’t drafted.  He could’ve gone overseas and capitalized on that success but chose the NBA G-League, before getting his NBA shot.In 2018 his resilience paid off as he earned his first world championship ring.  Had it not been for his virtuoso effort in game two of this year’s NBA Finals, the injured world champions would have probably gotten swept.last_img read more

Netflix is set to premier Ricky Gervais comedy Der

first_imgNetflix is set to premier Ricky Gervais comedy Derek later this in each of the markets the VOD service is live, apart from the UK.The British comedy series (7×30’), which aired on Channel 4 in the UK earlier this year following a pilot episode in 2012, is set to go live on Netflix on September 12.It will debut on the online service in the US, Canada, Ireland, Latin America, Brazil and the Nordics. In the UK, Channel 4, which already offers the series on its catch-service 4oD, recently renewed the show for a second season.last_img

Netflixs subscriber count is tipped to reach 128

first_imgNetflix’s subscriber count is tipped to reach 128 million by 2022, with the number of international viewers expected to exceed those in the US by early 2018.This is according to a new study by Digital TV Research, which predicts that Netflix’s overall subscriber number will climb by 44% between the end of 2016 and 2022 – with subscriber increases expected across all geographical regions.By 2022, North America and Western Europe combined are expected to supply 72% of Netflix’s total subscriber base by 2022 – down from 81% in 2016. However, North American Netflix subscriber numbers are expected to climb from 53.6 million in 2016 to 63.3 million in 2022, while in Western Europe they are expected to climb from 18.6 million in 2016 to 29.0 million in 2022.In Asia Pacific, Netflix’s subscriber count is expected to almost triple from 3.6 million subscribers in 2016 to 10.2 million in 2022. In Latin America numbers the figure is tipped to rise from 10.9 million to 16.3 million.Growth is also predicted in Netflix’s smaller markets between 2016 and 2022. In Eastern Europe the SVOD service’s subscriber numbers are due to go from 1.1 million to 3.5 million; in MENA they are expected to climb from 655,000 to 3.5 million; and in Africa to go from 172,000 to 1.4 million.“This impressive growth comes despite Netflix not having direct access to subscribers in the world’s largest country: China,” said Digital TV Research principal analyst, Simon Murray.“Furthermore, Digital TV Research believes that Netflix will fall foul of Russian legislation. Due to be introduced in July 2017, this restricts foreign companies to only 20% of digital platforms’ equity.”Netflix established a global presence in January 2016, after it launched in 130 more countries – including across Africa and Eastern Europe.Digital TV Research estimates that these countries accounted for 3 million subscribers at the end of 2016, with this due to rise to 14 million by 2022 – some 11% of Netflix’s global total.Subscription revenues for Netflix will climb from US$8.29 billion in 2016 to US$14.86 billion in 2022, according to the research.The 60 countries that Netflix had a footprint in before January 2016 are expected to provide 90% of revenues in 2022, though Asia Pacific is expected to quadruple its revenues to more than US$1 billion.last_img read more