Hendrick signs new Burnley deal

first_imgBurnley have announced that midfielder Jeff Hendrick has signed a contract extension to stay at Turf Moor until the summer of 2020.Hendrick has made 91 appearances and scored five goals since joining Burnley from Derby County in August 2016.The 26-year-old started 29 Premier League games last season to help Burnley finish seventh in the Premier League and qualify for Europa League.The Ireland international is known as versatile midfield man and has been deployed centrally and in a more attacking role this season.His current deal was due to expire at the end of the season, but the club has today exercised their option to extend his stay by 12 months.Burnley FC v Manchester City - Premier LeagueMatch Preview: Burnley vs Liverpool Boro Tanchev – August 30, 2019 Premier League leaders Liverpool travel to Burnley for the Matchday 4 of the 2019-20 Premier League campaign.LATEST: Clarets Extend Hendrick Stay https://t.co/Cw6rxRxjB5— Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) December 20, 2018“He’s done well for us,” Burnley manager Sean Dyche told the club’s website.“We have asked a lot of him. We have used him in a number of different positions that sometimes aren’t natural to him and over time he has delivered good performances for us.”last_img read more

POLICE LOG for August 18 Police Mistakenly Called On Band Camp Trees

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Saturday, August 18, 2018:Police dragged a large tree branch blocking the roadway on Taplin Avenue and contacted DPW. (10:19am)Vehicle spun out on 93 South, before Exit 39. Vehicle in tree line. State Police to handle. (11:48am)A detail officer reported a paving truck pulled down old telephone lines on Ballardvale Street. (2:41pm)A resident on Adams Street reported 15-20 teens were congregated in the high school parking lot. Police responded. Teens were marching band students. (8:56pm)A train was blocking Route 62 at North Wilmington station. (10:39pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip?Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 11: Incidents Not What They Seem; Marijuana Confiscated From Vehicle; Missing Woman FoundIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 14: Missing Teen Located; Trash Left Behind At Yentile FarmIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 23: Break-Ins on Ballardvale Street; Ride-On Lawn Mower vs. Parked Car; Erratic DriverIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Pass the wine metal mouth The whole tooth about wearing adult braces

first_img3:03 I’m 51 years old, and I wear braces. Some days, I almost forget I have them on. Other times, when I’m doing something outwardly grown-up, like buying wine or meeting with my daughter’s fifth-grade teacher, I’m achingly aware that my teeth are sporting accessories usually seen on kids who don’t remember a time before YouTube.But I’m not alone. The American Association of Orthodontists reports that as of 2016, 28 percent of the patients being treated by its members are over 18. That’s more than 1.6 million people. And I can tell you from experience that many of them have probably wondered at least once if they’re too old for this.I’ve been down this metal-mouthed road before. The first time I had braces, I was 13 years old, it was the 1980s and, unlike today, braces didn’t even attempt to disguise what they were.Back then, braces were silver, they couldn’t be hidden, and it seemed like orthodontists weren’t even trying. There were none of these clear brackets, or see-through, removable aligners, or rainbow-colored elastic bands to match your school colors. No one thought to put braces on the back of your teeth. Get real, kid.I didn’t even go to an orthodontist for my first set of braces. My regular dentist told my mother he could handle it himself. I’m not sure that’s a choice an informed patient would make today. But again, 1980s.With my 9-year-old daughter, Kelly, on a bullet train in Japan just weeks after I got braces. Of the two of us, Kelly would seem the more appropriate age for orthodontics, but I’ve since learned that “appropriate” is relative. Gael Fashingbauer Cooper My teenage braces did their job. My teeth look fairly straight in my college photos and my wedding album. But I never had a retainer or any follow-up treatment. I mentally put braces in the past, with acne and algebra, and moved on.But as the years went by, I noticed what I called an “overbite” and what I later learned was really an “overjet.” In an overbite, the upper teeth overlap the lower. In an overjet, the teeth kind of lean forward. No one ever called it out to me — thank you friends for not being jerks — but in this age of social media, I began to hate selfies, to wonder why smiling didn’t come naturally to me, and to stare at my friends’ dazzling Facebook grins with envy.It’s embarrassing to write this, but I saw my overjet as a personal failure, on par with getting a cavity for not brushing. Somehow in my head, admitting that I needed orthodontic treatment was like admitting I messed up. It sounds stupid when I write it down — it’s not like I caused it by yanking my teeth apart with a crowbar — but there it is. I still remember how tears caught in my throat over a decade ago, the first time I asked a dentist for an orthodontist referral. Comments And as promised, the braces are working. With 20 months down and about four to go, I can see that the overjet has shrunk to nearly nothing. The gaps where the extracted teeth once were have filled in. And I notice surprising changes every day. My lips now make more of a model-esque Cupid’s bow, something I used to envy in Facebook photos of others. Both edges of my smile rise up evenly now. I’m slowly acquiring the look I envied in those photogenic friends, even if only I notice it.Dr. Brent Larson, the president of the American Association of Orthodontists, and Dr. Lee Graber, secretary-general of the World Federation of Orthodontics, patiently took me through the changes in braces technology over the years, and answered all my questions about adult orthodontics.”As long as you’re alive, teeth can move,” Dr. Larson said.Dr. Graber told me his oldest orthodontics patient was 88, was delighted with his braces, and is now “still going strong into his 90s.”But it wasn’t the technology changes that finally made me decide to get braces at 50. I had to cross a mental line that I honestly didn’t think I could ever get myself over. And maybe you have your own mental line. It might not be braces, but it’s some kind of risk that for whatever reason, is important to you. Maybe it doesn’t matter to anyone else, but you think about it all the time, and wonder if you can ever force yourself to make it happen.bracesoldnewThe braces on the left date to 1929, and feature actual gold bands on the top teeth. They’re a heck of a lot less subtle than the modern braces on the right, which like mine, feature translucent brackets. Even the wires are impressive: They’re heat-activated nickel-titanium wires developed with help from NASA. American Association of Orthodontists I read recently that Warren Buffett, the Nebraska billionaire, reportedly has three boxes on his desk — IN, OUT and TOO HARD. Who can’t relate to that? I mentally put “braces” in my TOO HARD box for years and years.Not all life improvements are doable. Money prevents us from some. Family or job responsibilities eliminate others. But somewhere in your mental TOO HARD box, there might be a big dream you can actually accomplish.When people would write in to Dear Abby and say they dreamed of going back to college, but worried that they’d be however-many years old when they graduated, they’d get the blunt response: “How old would you be by then if you didn’t get your degree?”The point was clear: You can keep growing and changing and improving yourself as you age, or you can get older and always regret never taking the plunge.If you need to point to someone who discovered that it wasn’t too late to make a major change in her life, you can point to me.I’m 51 years old, and I wear braces. Share your voice Tags Top 5 foods I’ll devour after braces 2 Culture Wellness Now playing: Watch this: I still remember how tears caught in my throat over a decade ago, the first time I asked a dentist for an orthodontist referral. I kept that little green card for probably a year — the hygienist had casually scribbled on it, “severe overbite.” My teeth weren’t causing me any physical issues, but that one word, “severe,” made me think I was a lost cause. It didn’t help that she also cheerily remarked that an orthodontist would probably have to break my jaw to treat my teeth. What? Am I torture-victim Theon in Game of Thrones? Eventually, I threw the card away and tried not to think about it.You know how you can set email reminders to pop up regularly, daily or weekly or whatever? For about three years, I had a reminder that popped up every Wednesday that just said “call about ortho.” And like a tired kid punching the snooze alarm, I slammed it shut and did nothing. I slept on it for literally years. Zzzzz…soph-1I can’t believe my boss made me share this photo, but here I am in 1982, the first time I had braces. The brackets were not see-through and subtle like brackets are today.  Gael Fashingbauer Cooper It was my husband, who also had braces in the 1980s, who actually woke me up. His top teeth are an orthodontist’s dream, but a few bottom teeth are now crooked. They bothered him, but rather than ignore the issue for a decade like I did, he decided to take action immediately, simply walking into an orthodontist’s office and signing up for a consultation.He convinced me to make an appointment, and I was blown away by how different the experience was from what I had dreaded. The staff was exceptionally friendly, the office was clean, crisp and high-tech, the treatment methods today were as different from those of the 1980s as dial-up internet is from broadband. Brackets are now clear, X-rays are digital, appliances are smaller and more comfortable.But at nearly 50, was I just too old for braces?My treatment wasn’t going to be easy. I couldn’t get away with clear aligners such as Invisalign, my teeth needed more. But that early hygienist had been wrong: No one would need to break my jaw.I did need two teeth extracted to make room for the teeth to move, and believe me, that was the worst part of this experience that’s now going on two years. The teeth were healthy, solid adult teeth that did not want to be evicted, and having them pulled was one of the most unnatural and disturbing experiences I can remember.”That was among the top 10 toughest extractions of my career,” my dentist later told me. You and me both, sister.After the extractions healed, on went the braces. My new orthodontist installed clear brackets, a huge improvement on the silver ones I had as a kid. The clunky silver wire that helped give old-school braces their train-tracks nickname is still there, yes. But in some photos, it’s not clear on first glance I have anything on my teeth at all.iyaz-jpgEnlarge ImageI’m not the only one at CNET who’s worn braces as an adult. Here’s Iyaz Akhtar showing off his shiny smile at Google headquarters in 2018. He’s since had his braces removed. Iyaz Akhtar This path to a better smile ain’t cheap. A spokesperson for the American Association of Orthodontists said that while her group doesn’t collect information on average costs, the American Dental Association does. In a 2016 survey, that group reported that fees for comprehensive treatment of adolescents ranged from $4,978 to $6,900, and that the range for adults was slightly higher, ranging from $5,100 to $7,045.I had to squeeze my savings to come up with a decent down payment, and there’s a monthly bill similar to a car payment. My dental insurance doesn’t cover any of it, and sometimes, it’s a scramble to pay.Plus, braces require more constant upkeep than I’d have given them as a teen.I can’t eat certain things, from the obvious (caramels or corn on the cob) to the surprising (certain cereals and even rice are a horror to floss out). Cleaning my teeth requires special disposable flossers that I buy online. Brackets pop loose. Wires poke me. Monthly appointments to tighten the braces leave me popping Advil and eating soup. As a teen, I probably would’ve dramatically thrown myself on the bed and demanded to know why my parents were putting me through this.But I’m 51 now, and my sense of what’s painful in life has been tempered by real experiences. I’ve lost loved ones. I’ve worried over biopsies. Two years of dental inconvenience doesn’t make my own top 10 list of life hardships, or maybe even my top 100.last_img read more

Jet rescue plan hits another air pocket as HDFC plans to auction

first_imgIn July 2017, Jet Airways had asked its junior pilots, who joined the brand in 2016, to take a 30 percent pay cut or leave. Jet Airways grounded all flights on April 17.ReutersHopes of Jet Airways stakeholders to see the airline back on the skies have suffered yet another setback with a lender’s move to auction off the airline’s premium office property in Mumbai’s prestigious Bandra Kurla Complex (BKC) to recover defaulted loan instalments of Rs 415 crore. The debt-riddled airline is already battling a host of financial, legal and regulatory hurdles in its attempt to resume operations. HDFC Bank is planning to sell the airline’s 52,775 sq ft office at an auction with a base price of Rs 245 crore.HDFC Bank said in a notice that the borrower (Jet Airways) has failed to repay amounts due to the bank, making it entitled to “enforce its mortgage over the immovable property”, a report in India Today says. Jet Airways had bought the land through an auction in 2008 for Rs 826 crore, a Livemint report said. The property is expected to attract heavy bidding because of its prime location.India’s first private airline, for which the banks led by the State Bank of India (SBI) has formed a rescue plan, has a total debt burden of about Rs 10,500 crore. It also owes upwards of Rs 2,500 crore in staff salary arrears and payments to vendors and service providers. Some service providers have threatened to haul the carrier through the bankruptcy proceedings. Industry observers are still unsure whether the airline could fly again, but its stakeholders hope there will be at least one serious bid before the deadline elapses on Friday. The SBI Capital Markets Limited, which manages the bids, has shortlisted four potential investors who have submitted their expressions of interest (EoI). Apart from the private carrier’s strategic partner the United Arab Emirates (UAE)-based Etihad Airways, two private equity firms, TPG Capital and Indigo Partners submitted their EoIs in time. State-owned National Investment and Industrial Fund (NIIF) has also been shortlisted. Abu Dhabi-based Etihad holds a 14 per cent stake in the airline. Workers cover the cockpit window of a Jet Airways aircraft parked at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport in Mumbai, on March 26.ReutersMeanwhile, the offer of airline founder Naresh Goyal to infuse another Rs 250 crore to help the grounded airline to resume operations has raised interest in some quarters. Goyal has a 24 per cent stake in the airline after the debt restructuring. In the absence of any other bids, the belated EoI from little known British entrepreneur Jason Unsworth also assumes significance. Unsworth, a former flight steward with Ryan Air, had tweeted: “Last night our consortium submitted to SBI the EoI document.” In a second tweet, he named Lakshay Uttam (My World Venture), Lalit Verma (Future Trend Capital), Dhiraj (Redcliffe Capital), Naresh Goyal (Jet Air) and Sachin Nalawade (Malhar Hospitality & Events) as the consortium partners. Unsworth set up Atmosphere Intercontinental Airlines in 2005 and has shown repeated interest to take over Jet since its collapse.Meanwhile, Mint reported that the registrar of companies (RoC) has submitted a report to the Corporate Affairs Ministry after examining the airline’s books. The RoC began examining the airline’s books after it deferred its first-quarter report for the last financial year (2018-19). The Enforcement Directorate (ED) is sniffing around Jet Airways accounts to ascertain whether any norms were violated in Etihad investment in Jet Privilege Pvt Ltd (JPPL), the company that runs the airline’s frequent flier programme, a report in Business Standard says. The deal with the Abu Dhabi-based carrier was concluded in 2014, an ED source said. Etihad owns a 50.1 per cent stake in JPPL, while Jet Airways holds 49.9 per cent.last_img read more

What Could the Mexico Trade Deal Mean for Houston Business

first_img 00:00 /07:44 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen X center_img We’re learning more about the Trump administration’s tentative trade deal with Mexico to update NAFTA. The handshake agreement is the result of weeks of negotiation between the U.S. and Mexico – without Canada – to bring NAFTA into the 21st century.Tony Payan from Rice University tells News 88. 7 from what we know of the deal so far, it’s a mixed bag.“All in all, is it a gain of certainty in the markets? Yes. Is it an enormous gain? I doubt it,” he said. “There’s still much, much work still pending, and, of course, Canada’s own place at the table is still to be defined.”The deal is essentially a series of bullet points right now – with the exact language yet to be ironed out. But some highlights include changes to vehicle manufacturing tariffs.Right now, vehicles produced in North America can be sold in the U.S. duty-free – as long as about two-thirds of their parts come from North America. But the new deal would increase that to 75 percent. And it would also require a large portion of such vehicles be produced in higher-wage factories.President Trump had also wanted a sunset clause that ended the new agreement after five years – unless it was renewed. However, the new agreement would have a 16-year term, with an option to review and change it at the six-year mark.So, what could this new agreement mean for businesses in Houston and Texas? In the audio above, we have some reaction and analysis from Vance Ginn, senior economist for the Austin-based conservative think tank the Texas Public Policy Foundation, and Chris Tomlinson, business columnist for the Houston Chronicle. Evan Vucci/AP PhotoOutgoing Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto meets with U.S. President Donald Trump. Sharelast_img read more

In Wake of Professors Comments Katherine Johnson is Still Celebrated in Physics

first_imgBy Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent@StacyBrownMediaFor many, the words of a senior scientist who said physics “was invented and built by men,” stung. The words earlier this month of Professor Alessandro Strumia, who was suspended from working with the European nuclear research center, Cern, served as a reminder of the great accomplishments of Katherine Johnson, who recently turned 100.Celebrate indeed. Strumia also claimed in his controversial comments that physics is “becoming sexist against men.”Katherine Johnson’s work at NASA’s Langley Research Center spanned 1953 to 1986 and included calculating the trajectory of the early space launches. (Photo: NASA Sean Smith / Wikimedia Commons)“Let’s celebrate our sister leader, Katherine Johnson,” NNPA President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., said this week. “We’re reminded,” Chavis said, “of Johnson, who hand-crunched the numbers for America’s first manned space flight – a feat that finally got its Big Screen acknowledgement just two years ago. Katherine Johnson’s historic contributions to the evolution of applied mathematics and aerospace science epitomizes her genius to overcome the scientific challenges of her generation.”“Today, African American women in particular should be inspired by the example of Katherine Johnson in STEM career fields,” Chavis said. “The NNPA salutes Johnson’s transformative legacy that is no longer hidden.”The recipient of the 2015 National Medal of Freedom who was also recognized by People Magazine in 2016 as one of the 25 Women Changing the World, Johnson enjoyed a brilliant 33-year career at NASA. That portion of her life story was featured on the big screen in “Hidden Figures,” the award-winning movie, starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe.In an earlier interview, she told NNPA Newswire that she missed working. “I’d go back now,” she said.After leaving her teaching job in 1953, Johnson began working for NASA, “hand” calculating the trajectories for several space missions, including for the famed space flight of Alan Shephard, the first American in space, and the trajectory for the famed 1968 Apollo 11 flight to the Moon.“I’d do them over if I had to. I’d do anything for anyone,” she said.At an early age, Johnson developed enviable math skills that are recounted on the NASA website in  featured piece titled, “The girl who loved to count.” “I counted everything. I counted the steps to the road, the steps up to church, the number of dishes and silverware I washed … anything that could be counted, I did,” Johnson said.“I entered college, I was 15. I was going to be a math teacher because that was it. You could be a math teacher or a nurse, but I was told I would make a good research mathematician and they had me take all of the courses in the catalogue,” she said.When Astronaut John Glenn went to the moon, Johnson said her “Hidden Figures” crew acted as the computer for the mission. She said calculating everything involved in the flight became like a geometry problem.“I felt most proud of the success of the Apollo mission. We had to determine so much. Where you were, where the moon would be and how fast the astronauts were going,” Johnson said.“We were really concerned but the astronaut had to do it just as we laid it out. I was looking at the television and hoping that we were right,” she said.Born in 1918 in West Virginia, Johnson was a research mathematician, who by her own admission, was simply fascinated by numbers, according to her biography posted by NASA. By the age of 10, Johnson was a high school freshman – an amazing feat in an era when school for African-Americans normally stopped at eighth grade.Her father was determined that Johnson would have a chance to meet her potential. “He drove the family 120 miles to Institute, West Virginia, where I could continue my education through high school,” she said.An achiever at the highest level, Johnson graduated from high school at 14 and from college at 18.By 1953, the growing demands of early space research meant there were openings for African American “computers” (a term that held a different meaning at that time than it does today) at Langley Research Center’s Guidance and Navigation Department – and Johnson found the perfect place to put her extraordinary mathematical skills to work.Glenn requested that she personally recheck the calculations made by the new electronic computers before his flight aboard Friendship 7 – the mission on which he became the first American to orbit the Earth.She continued to work at NASA until 1986.Her calculations proved as critical to the success of the Apollo Moon landing program and the start of the Space Shuttle program as they did to those first steps on the country’s journey into space, according to NASA.Still, Johnson said the book, the Academy Award-nominated movie and her celebrated work with NASA aren’t her greatest accomplishments.“Just staying alive is the greatest accomplishment,” she said.last_img read more