OBITUARY Reverend Richard Robert Bolduc 92

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Rev. Richard Robert Bolduc, OMI, 92, died on February 2, 2019, at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Residence in Tewksbury, Massachusetts. He was a son of the late Adelard and Aimee (Vaillancourt) Bolduc. He was predeceased by two sisters, Sr. Louise Bolduc, PM, and Rose Bolduc; and by two brothers, Andre and Raymond.Fr. Bolduc was born and educated in Biddeford, Maine where he attended St. Louis High School. He served in the United States Army from 1946 to 1947 and in the United States Air Force from 1951 to 1954, being honorably discharged from both branches of the military.Between 1954 and 1964, he completed his religious studies at the Missionary Oblate Seminaries in Bar Harbor, Maine and Natick, Massachusetts.On August 2, 1958, Fr. Bolduc professed his first vows as a Missionary Oblate of Mary Immaculate at the Oblate Novitiate in Colebrook, New Hampshire. He professed perpetual vows at the Oblate Seminary in Natick in 1961. He was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Louis Collignon, OMI on January 19, 1964, in Notre Dame de Lourdes Church, Lowell, Massachusetts.In 1965, he received his first assignment to the missions in Haiti where he did parish ministry until early 2001. Parishes he was assigned to were Ste. Anne, Camp Perrin; Sacred Heart, Les Cayes; St. Jeanne, Chantal; St. John the Baptist, Tiburon; Our Lady of the Assumption, Ouanaminthe; Sacred Heart, Cape Haitian; and St. Charles Borromé, Ferrier. In 2001, after ministering in Haiti for 36 years, Fr. Bolduc returned to the U.S. and joined the Oblate Community on Mt. Washington Street in Lowell, then joined the community at St. Eugene House in Lowell. In May of 2003, he transferred to the Immaculate Heart of Mary Residence in Tewksbury. He did part-time ministry while able, serving at both St. Dorothy’s Church (now part of the Parish of the Transfiguration) in Wilmington, Massachusetts, and at D’Youville Senior Care in Lowell. He fully retired in 2015 and remained in Tewksbury until his death.In addition to his Oblate family, he is survived by a brother, Jerome, and his wife, Betty Ann, of Florida; and by a nephew, Marc, and his wife, Pat, of Biddeford, Maine.Services and calling hours were in the Chapel at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Residence, 486 Chandler Street, Tewksbury. Calling hours were held on Thursday, February 7, 2019, from 2-4 and 7-9 pm with a Prayer Service at 7:30 pm. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Friday, February 8, 2019, at 11:00 am. Interment took place in the Oblate Cemetery.Donations in memory of Fr. Bolduc may be made to the Oblate Infirmary Fund, 486 Chandler Street, Tewksbury, MA 01876.Rev. Richard Robert Bolduc(NOTE: The above obituary is from McKenna-Ouellette D’Amato: A Life Celebration Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Reverend Paul W. Berube, 84In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of February 3, 2019)In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Mark Francis Wood, 86In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Israel legalises outposts on Palestinian land

first_imgThe Israeli parliament on Monday finalised a controversial law legalising dozens of Jewish outposts built on private Palestinian land in the occupied West Bank.The law—approved by 60 members of parliament to 52 against—was slammed by the Palestinians as a means to “legalise theft” of land.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who did not participate in the law’s final votes since he was returning from a trip to Britain, said he had “updated” the US administration so as not to surprise “our friends”.Speaking after the law was finalised, Bezalel Smotrich of the far-right Jewish Home party, who was one of the forces behind the legislation, thanked the American people for electing Donald Trump as president, “without whom the law would have probably not passed”.The new law will allow Israel to legally seize Palestinian private land on which Israelis built without knowing it was private property or because the state allowed them to do so.Palestinian owners will be compensated financially or with other land.The Palestine Liberation Organisation said the law was a means to “legalise theft” and demonstrated “the Israeli government’s will to destroy any chances for a political solution.”A PLO statement stressed that the “Israeli settlement enterprise negates peace and the possibility of the two-state solution.”Ahead of the vote, opposition chief and Labour leader Isaac Herzog lashed out against the “despicable law” that he said would undermine the country’s Jewish majority.“The vote tonight isn’t for or against the settlers, rather Israel’s interests,” Herzog said.The law would “annex millions of Palestinians into Israel”, he warned, and expose Israeli soldiers and politicians to lawsuits at international criminal courts.Science and Technology Minister Ofir Akunis of Netanyahu’s Likud party said the argument was over the right to the Land of Israel.“All of the Land of Israel belongs to the Jewish people,” he told Herzog, using the biblical term that included the West Bank. “This right is eternal and indisputable.”The law is seen by critics as promoting at least partial annexation of the West Bank, a key demand for parts of Netanyahu’s right-wing cabinet, including Jewish Home.Human Rights Watch said the law “reflects Israel’s manifest disregard of international law” and deepens the “de facto permanent occupation” of the West Bank, warning that “the Trump administration cannot shield them from the scrutiny of the International Criminal Court”.Israeli rights group B’Tselem said the law proved Israel “has no intention of ending its control over the Palestinians or its theft of their land.”The bill could still be challenged, with Defence Minister Avigdor Lieberman saying last week: “The chance that it will be struck down by the Supreme Court is 100 percent.”Last week, the few hundred residents of the Amona outpost in the West Bank were evicted after the Supreme Court ruled their homes were built on private Palestinian land.Amona demolitionsIn parliament on Monday, Shuli Mualem of Jewish Home dedicated the law to those evicted from Amona.International law considers all settlements to be illegal, but Israel distinguishes between those it sanctions and those it does not, dubbed outposts.The lengthy Amona saga—including the evictions broadcast live on Israeli television—directly inspired the bill.Demolitions and removal of the buildings there began on Monday.The law applies to 53 other outposts and homes within existing settlements recognised by Israel built on Palestinian land, according to the anti-settlement organisation Peace Now.More than 3,800 homes would be “legalised”, the NGO said ahead of the vote.UN envoy for the Middle East peace process Nickolay Mladenov said ahead of the Monday vote he was “concerned” by the law, which could “greatly diminish the prospects for Arab-Israeli peace.”Since Trump’s inauguration, Israel has announced more than 6,000 new homes in the West Bank and east Jerusalem, seen as key parts of any future Palestinian state.For the first time last week Trump’s administration said settlement expansion “may not be helpful” for peace prospects, but also broke with previous administrations by saying settlements were not an obstacle to peace.The White House statement was interpreted as a message to Netanyahu and his government that the US administration intended to reserve its options.Israeli Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit has warned the government that the law could be unconstitutional and risks exposing Israel to international prosecution for war crimes.last_img read more

Nepalese man held with snake venom worth over Rs 1 crore

first_imgDarjeeling: The Sashashtra Seema Bal (SSB) apprehended a Nepalese citizen trying to sneak in a jar of crystallised snake venom from the country worth more than Rs 1 crore. The person has been arrested and later remanded to two days police custody by a Siliguri Court.The incident occurred on Thursday evening at Panitanki, the Indo-Nepal border near Siliguri. Troopers of the 41 Battalion of SSB were manning the Border OutPost when they saw the person acting suspiciously. He had crossed over from Nepal. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseHe was then questioned by the SSB and then frisked. A bag was then recovered from the man, identified as 49-year-old Bal Bahadur Yava. Inside the bag they found a jar of snake venom. He is a resident of Jhapa, Nepal. Later, Yava was handed over to the police at Khoribari police station. Booked under Section 51 of the Wildlife Protection Act, he was produced at the ACJM Court in Siliguri on Friday. “His bail prayer was rejected and he has been remanded to two days police custody,” stated Sudip Rai Basunia, Assistant Public Prosecutor, Siliguri. The bullet-proof glass jar bore labels of Red Dragon (the name of the company) and Made in France. The jar is being sent to Haffkine Institute, Mumbai for tests. It may be mentioned that since 2015, multiple jars of snake venom have been recovered from this region.last_img read more