OBITUARY Reverend Richard Robert Bolduc 92

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Rev. Richard Robert Bolduc, OMI, 92, died on February 2, 2019, at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Residence in Tewksbury, Massachusetts. He was a son of the late Adelard and Aimee (Vaillancourt) Bolduc. He was predeceased by two sisters, Sr. Louise Bolduc, PM, and Rose Bolduc; and by two brothers, Andre and Raymond.Fr. Bolduc was born and educated in Biddeford, Maine where he attended St. Louis High School. He served in the United States Army from 1946 to 1947 and in the United States Air Force from 1951 to 1954, being honorably discharged from both branches of the military.Between 1954 and 1964, he completed his religious studies at the Missionary Oblate Seminaries in Bar Harbor, Maine and Natick, Massachusetts.On August 2, 1958, Fr. Bolduc professed his first vows as a Missionary Oblate of Mary Immaculate at the Oblate Novitiate in Colebrook, New Hampshire. He professed perpetual vows at the Oblate Seminary in Natick in 1961. He was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Louis Collignon, OMI on January 19, 1964, in Notre Dame de Lourdes Church, Lowell, Massachusetts.In 1965, he received his first assignment to the missions in Haiti where he did parish ministry until early 2001. Parishes he was assigned to were Ste. Anne, Camp Perrin; Sacred Heart, Les Cayes; St. Jeanne, Chantal; St. John the Baptist, Tiburon; Our Lady of the Assumption, Ouanaminthe; Sacred Heart, Cape Haitian; and St. Charles Borromé, Ferrier. In 2001, after ministering in Haiti for 36 years, Fr. Bolduc returned to the U.S. and joined the Oblate Community on Mt. Washington Street in Lowell, then joined the community at St. Eugene House in Lowell. In May of 2003, he transferred to the Immaculate Heart of Mary Residence in Tewksbury. He did part-time ministry while able, serving at both St. Dorothy’s Church (now part of the Parish of the Transfiguration) in Wilmington, Massachusetts, and at D’Youville Senior Care in Lowell. He fully retired in 2015 and remained in Tewksbury until his death.In addition to his Oblate family, he is survived by a brother, Jerome, and his wife, Betty Ann, of Florida; and by a nephew, Marc, and his wife, Pat, of Biddeford, Maine.Services and calling hours were in the Chapel at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Residence, 486 Chandler Street, Tewksbury. Calling hours were held on Thursday, February 7, 2019, from 2-4 and 7-9 pm with a Prayer Service at 7:30 pm. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Friday, February 8, 2019, at 11:00 am. Interment took place in the Oblate Cemetery.Donations in memory of Fr. Bolduc may be made to the Oblate Infirmary Fund, 486 Chandler Street, Tewksbury, MA 01876.Rev. Richard Robert Bolduc(NOTE: The above obituary is from McKenna-Ouellette D’Amato: A Life Celebration Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Reverend Paul W. Berube, 84In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of February 3, 2019)In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Mark Francis Wood, 86In “Obituaries”last_img read more

NASA engineer looks to Saturn moon Titan for human colony

first_img See dramatic clouds streak across Saturn’s moon Titan See Cassini’s last image before it died at Saturn 4 Tags So far, Wellons is doing a good job of selling us on Titan, but the moon isn’t exactly a body double for Maui. It’s chilly to the tune of -290 degrees Fahrenheit (-179 degrees Celsius). NASA says you could walk around on Titan without a spacesuit, but you’d need an oxygen mask and protection from the cold.So Titan has some downsides, but it’s worth tossing it into the speculation hopper as we contemplate colonizing the solar system some day. I have to agree with Wellons when she says “it just seems like an awesome place to live.” 13 Photos Share your voice Cassini at Saturncenter_img Sci-Tech Enlarge ImageTitan poses in front of Saturn in this mosaic image from the Cassini mission. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Come, move to the moon: You can jump like a grasshopper. Come, move to Mars: You can bound like a bunny. Come, move to Titan: You can fly! I know which one I’d choose.NASA’s Janelle Wellons is pumping up Saturn’s moon Titan as a possible site of human settlement should Earth become uninhabitable. Wellons is an instrument operations engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She participated in a Reddit Q&A on Wednesday with women who work at NASA.space05.jpgEnlarge ImageTitan has a hazy atmosphere, which makes the surface difficult to see. Cassini’s near-infrared spectrometer penetrated the clouds to give us a look at its surface. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/University of Idaho A Reddit user asked, “Where would the most suitable place in the universe be to go if we couldn’t theoretically live on Earth anymore?”Wellons suggests Titan, calling it a more interesting answer than the standard Mars or moon response. Wellons used to work as an engineer on NASA’s Cassini mission, which is now over. The spacecraft spent years studying the ringed planet and its many satellites, including weird and fascinating Titan, Saturn’s largest moon.NASA chief scientist Jim Green had previously floated Titan as a possible option for colonization.”Titan is the only place besides Earth known to have liquids in the form of lakes and seas on its surface,” Wellons says. “These liquids are made of methane but, armed with the right kind of protective gear, one could theoretically be able to swim without harm!”Titan isn’t just a potential swimming spot, it also has a draw for anybody who’s ever taken flight in a dream. Wellons points to the thick atmosphere and its ability to shield us from space radiation. “It is so dense that we could actually attach wings to our arms and fly on this moon,” she says. Hell yeah.  Comments NASA shoots for Saturn’s moons with dazzling Cassini views (pictures) NASA Spacelast_img read more

I ate insects at ComicCon and now I want more

first_imgAnd now you know where to find cricket protein bars at Comic-Con. Erin Carson/CNET In the press room at San Diego Comic-Con, early Thursday evening, it’s snack time. Well, for me at least. At the risk of spoiling my dinner, I’m digging into a very particular type of protein bar — the kind that’s going to power me through my last story of the day, in more ways than one.The bar, brown and moist, is meant to taste like peanut butter and strawberry jelly. In truth, biting in you’d think that’s all that was in it. But along with the real strawberries and bits of peanut, this bar also contains crickets. Cricket powder, to be precise.Now, I’m not sitting here eating a cricket protein bar because I hate convention food that much. Share your voice 62 Photos Culture Comments The very best cosplay we saw at Comic-Con 2019 5 Now playing: Watch this: It’s actually in promotion of the upcoming TBS television series Snowpiercer. Snowpiercer is a TV adaption of a comic (it was also a movie in 2014) slated for 2020. The show takes place a few years after the world has become a frozen wasteland. A train carries what remains of humanity, and even in the apocalypse there’s a disparity between the folks in the fancy front of the train and the ones barely getting by in the back.And by barely getting by, we’re talking about subsisting off nutrient bars of jellied cockroaches.Fortunately, the protein bar that Comic-Con goers can pick up from one of several vending machines is nothing like that. Tragically, it’s not made with cockroaches. It’s also pretty good — dense, chewy, a bit crunchy, the strawberry lends a fresh note, and it doesn’t taste like, well, crickets.snowpiercer2.jpgMmm… crickets. Erin Carson/CNET As for the idea of subsisting on protein bars, I get it. When I arrive at the Snowpiercer booth on the expo floor at 4:30 p.m. PT, I’ve eaten two caramel toffee sea salt bars and nothing else all day long. The world might not have frozen over, but these are, nonetheless, meager times on the food front in the midst of a 130,000-plus person convention with entirely too much to take in.To get the cricket bar, you go up to a vending machine with a giant touchscreen, and enter your email address, watch a short video from Snowpiercer, and down drops a cricket protein bar in a black wrapper with blue and white lettering.Scarfing down a bug bar isn’t just a promotional stunt. The bars come from the Aspire Food Group, a company based in Austin, Texas that raises crickets for human consumption. Aspire’s been on a mission to educate people about how edible insects like crickets are often higher in iron, protein, calcium and the like, and are also a more environmentally sustainable source of nutrients, than meat. And since Snowpiercer is essentially dealing with the aftermath of climate change, Aspire CEO and co-founder Mohammed Ashour thinks it’s a point worth underlining.”The show talks about a dystopian future where as a result of a lot of social collapses, you end up in this world where there’s this asymmetry in how nutrition and wealth and abundance and opportunity is distributed,” Ashour said. That’s not merely science fiction. “We are using tremendous amounts of resources to produce nutrition calories at an incredible environmental cost.”Can swapping out steak for some crickets keep us all off the apocalypse train? That remains to be seen, but Ashour is hoping Comic-Con’s attendees will consider it.And hey — at least it’s not cockroaches. Whole roasted crickets infest snack time Tags 3:04 Comic-Conlast_img read more