LETTER TO THE EDITOR Selectman Candidate Kevin MacDonald Offers Solutions To N

first_imgDear Editor,I am opposed to the elimination of any train stops. The tax payers of Wilmington pay the MBTA $518,000 per year to have the two train stations in Wilmington. I believe the people of Wilmington deserve full service at both stops. The train in North Wilmington does not have to block the road known as Rte. 62 / Middlesex Avenue. This was absolutely shown when I took the train from Lawrence to North Wilmington and asked to get off the first car so the train did not block the road. A further indication of this can easily be explained by simply understanding that the same train leaves North Station to come to North Wilmington and clears the road to let passengers off. We need to work to make the lives of Wilmington residents easier and more convenient. People who need to get toward and to Boston for work or an appointment to see a doctor deserve all stops to remain at North Wilmington.My advice and proposal to Wilmington officials is to position public safety vehicles on the other side of the tracks ahead of the scheduled stops. I also wanted to add that a garage bay at the D.P.W. and Brown’s Crossing locations could be designated for an emergency vehicle without the need for an expensive substation construction project.With regard to the proposed detox site at 362 Middlesex Avenue, I believe the State should take this property by eminent domain for the purpose of building a train station with senior housing above it and an eatery/cafe. Seniors and commuters can have a place to dine while waiting to take the train.The opioid problem is a State problem that needs a State solution. Many cities and towns are in the process of suing the opioid manufacturers. I believe it would be a beautiful thing to see a settlement with the opioid manufacturers that included giving us a state of the art treatment and recovery center on the grounds of the Tewksbury State Hospital. The State’s opioid addiction problem solution: funded by those who are alleged to have known that the opioids were addictive and sold them anyway.Unfortunately, our Selectmen have failed to negotiate with the owner’s of 362 Middlesex Avenue for an alternative development that eliminated the detox facility. We now have a law suit filed against the Town of Wilmington that could have been averted. It is time for the community to unite for truth and unite for change. It is also time to eliminate conflict of interest on the Board of Selectmen by electing new members who will fight on behalf of the community. Solutions are needed that improve people’s lives.Sincerely,Kevin MacDonaldCandidate for the Board of SelectmenLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLETTER TO THE EDITOR: Selectman Candidate Kevin MacDonald Says Town Should Hire A Grant WriterIn “Letter To The Editor”SELECTMEN NEWS: Town Comes Up With Fix For North Wilmington Commuter Rail StationIn “Government”SELECTMEN NEWS: Board Grapples With Whether To Eliminate 5 Daily Stops At N. Wilmington Commuter Rail StationIn “Government”last_img read more

5 more Chawkbazar fire victims identified CID

first_img.Criminal Investigation Department (CID) identified five more victims of Chawkbazar fire through DNA test on Tuesday, reports UNB.The victims are-Ismail Hossain, 60, Zafar Ahmed, 43, Foysal Sarowar, 53, Mostafa Mia, 39 and RehnumaTabassum Dola, 19.Additional Inspector General of Police Sheikh Himayet Hossain said the CID disclosed the identities of the deceased at a press briefing at its conference room in city’s Malibagh area.However, the identities of two victims of Chawkbazar fire incident could not be known yet as no DNA samples matched with the victims’ sample, he said.On 6 March, eleven more victims of Chawkbazar fire were identified through DNA tests.A deadly fire broke out at a chemical warehouse in Chawkbazar on 20 February. So far, 71 people have died.last_img

Trumps Treatment Of Women Dominant Issue In Second Debate

first_imgListen Share 00:00 /01:27 Andrew SchneiderPatrons of Axelrad Beer Garden watch the second 2016 presidential debate, projected on the side of neighboring Luigi’s Pizzeria.It’s been a rough weekend for Donald Trump. Friday’s revelations of a tape, in which the presidential candidate boasted his fame meant he could force himself on women with impunity, cast a long shadow over Sunday’s second presidential debate.That was evident from the mood of the crowd at a watch party at Midtown’s Axelrad Beer Garden. The audience at Axelrad largely favored Hillary Clinton to begin with. Trump’s response, when asked about the tape, didn’t win him any converts.Houston Public Media’s Coverage of Election 2016“I think it’s insulting to men to say that men in general are openly advocating sexual assault, as he is implying by saying that it’s just locker room banter to say those kinds of things,” says Clinton supporter Kris Kory. “And I think it’s insulting to women that he keeps glossing over it and saying that we’re just interpreting it the wrong way or he’s sorry if we’re offended. It’s an offensive and a disgusting thing that he’s said.”There were some Trump supporters in the audience. Zeljko Stajnovic says the Republican candidate defended himself well.“In my honest opinion,” Stajnovic says, “touching upon a locker room conversation that all men have had between each other – when he said it as a private citizen, nonetheless, who had no political aspirations at the time – trying to play that off politically is a low blow.”Tamara Sell, a volunteer deputy voter registrar, had a table set up at the front of the beer garden. She says the debate helped get people involved. “One young lady, she was Hispanic, came earlier and she said, ‘I’m not really sure if want to register to vote.’ And then after hearing the debate, she came back and she’s like, ‘I have to register.’”Sell says she registered more than 70 new voters over the course of the debate. X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

Airbnb Agreement With Texas Means Hosts Wont Get Around Paying Tax

first_img 00:00 /01:17 Listen Share X AP Photo/John LocherRandy Tussing, an Airbnb host, looks at his phone while standing in his home, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, in Las Vegas.Starting May 1, people who host paying guests through Airbnb in Texas won’t get around paying the 6 percent state hotel occupancy tax.Laura Spanjian, public policy director at Airbnb’s southwest region, said many hosts didn’t know they had to pay those taxes or couldn’t figure out how to.“So we decided, could we actually take on the responsibility of the host and have Airbnb collect and remit the tax?” she said. “So we realized, legally, we could do that if we had agreements with cities and states that in essence transferred responsibility from a host to us.”Texas is not the only place where the company is doing this.By next month, Airbnb will have similar agreements with 250 jurisdictions in the United States, including 20 states.David Stacy has hosted guests through Airbnb for the past two years in his garage apartment north of downtown Houston.He said he has never paid hotel occupancy taxes before, but he’s not concerned that the additional charge will deter potential guests.“I’ve looked at lots of websites for Airbnb in cities that I enjoy traveling to, and I see Airbnb there for a lot less than I would have to pay for a hotel,” he said. “So to me, I think it’s still a good bargain.”Stacy said he wants to abide by the law and is glad Airbnb is stepping in.The city of Houston, by the way, does not yet have an agreement with the company and will still be missing out on a lot of revenue from the local hotel occupancy tax, which is 7 percent.Spanjian said she is in talks with Houston as well. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

With Bathroom Bill Dead HoustonFounded Pastor Council Looks To Future Fights

first_img Share That initial group has since expanded into two additional entities, the Texas Pastor Council and the US Pastor Council, though the distinctions between the groups can be murky. Welch — who himself no longer preaches, instead referring to himself as a “pastor for pastors” — leads all three groups, and the main phone number for the US Pastor Council is a direct line to Welch.The group, according to Welch, has taken on a range of issues, from criminal justice reform to child foster care. But over the course of his career, Welch and the group have had a decided preoccupation with attacking LGBT rights, what Welch describes as “the continued tide of the radical political LGBTQ movement trying to work to undermine traditional marriage and traditional family.” On the US Pastor Council website, the only “current issue” listed is “Woman’s Privacy Protection,” a page that features a number of talking points in favor of a bathroom bill.“They have made anti-LGBT activism their primary focus,” said Dan Quinn, communications director for Texas Freedom Network, a liberal watchdog group. “They’ve had their most public efforts trying to defeat anything that protects equality for LGBT Texans.”Over the course of several years as a columnist for World Net Daily, a far-right website known for hosting conspiracy theories, Welch railed against same-sex marriage and legal protections for LGBT individuals. In a 2009 post titled “When the Wicked Rule,” Welch attacked a new federal law that protected LGBT individuals from hate crimes as condoning “every possible form of sexual deviancy.” He denounced the “radical sexual-deviancy jihad” in a post called “My Gay America” in 2010.“Lesbian Mayor Annise Parker has gone above and beyond to now extend protection through executive orders to ‘gender identity’ and ‘gender expression,’” he wrote at the time. “Keep your wives and daughters out of Houston city restrooms.”That rhetoric against Parker – the first openly gay mayor of a large American city — and legal protections for LGBT individuals in Houston would eventually become talking points against the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance, which would have made it illegal to discriminate against someone based on 15 different “protected characteristics,” including sex, race, religion, sexual orientation and gender identity.During that fight — which concluded with Houston residents voting overwhelmingly to strike down the nondiscrimination ordinance — Welch played a leading role in both the electoral and legal campaigns against the city. Jared Woodfill, one of the lead organizers against the HERO ordinance in Houston, said that Welch and his organization were “extremely instrumental” in gathering the signatures that would ultimately prompt the lawsuit and referendum overturning the ordinance.Indeed, organizing and mobilizing voters is a key part of the Pastor Council’s mission. Its website boasts pages titled “Every Christian Votes” and the “AMERICA plan.” Under the “AMERICA plan,” pastors are encouraged to communicate with congregants about political issues, distribute voter guides and register “every eligible adult” to vote.In other words, Welch had already established an infrastructure for turning out voters before the HERO referendum — a battle that helped elevate his organization and its platform. Randy Wilson, national field director for Church Ministries for the Washington, D.C.-based Family Research Council, which has worked with the Pastor Council, said this is easier said than done.“Dave has to have an established and billed credibility with the pastors, a very untrusting demographic, really,” he said.That credibility and visibility would only grow when the city issued subpoenas for sermons and other statements Welch and other members of the Pastors Council had made in support of a 2014 failed petition drive aimed at repealing HERO. That incident drew national attention, energizing conservatives across Texas and the country and landing Welch on national media. (In response to that incident, the Texas Legislature passed a lawearlier this year shielding pastors’ sermons from government subpoena power.)“It certainly escalated some elements of what we do to a much higher level because of the visibility of that Houston battle,” Welch said. “That achieved national attention.”With that momentum, Welch, Woodfill and other conservative activists began to look to the the Legislature as the next battleground for the issue. Welch would begin to use tactics that had worked in Houston — hosting workshops to educate pastors, blasting out emails on the issues and hosting rallies — on a statewide level.“The network of churches that has become involved in this issue has become very, very important,” Woodfill said.“The same model is being used across the state of Texas.”But that model has had its limits. In the Legislature, efforts to pass a bathroom bill have failed against stiff opposition from the House, in particular that of House Speaker Joe Straus.Despite those setbacks, the US Pastor Council itself has continued to grow, Welch said. According to tax documents on a database maintained by ProPublica, the US Pastor Council, which is registered as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization and does not disclose its donors, saw its revenue more than double from $329,696 to $833,749 between 2014 and 2015, the last year for which data is available and the year of the HERO ordinance vote in Houston.Welch said the group does not buy large ad campaigns, instead focusing resources on hosting workshops and organizing among pastors.“There aren’t many religious groups that overtly have this partisan affiliation or policy preference as pronounced as the Pastors Council,” said Brandon Rottinghaus, a political science professor at the University of Houston. “That’s been a major change we’ve seen since 2013 or 2014.”With primary season approaching, members of the Pastor Council are preparing to take their campaign to the ballot box and unseat Republicans who did not do enough to challenge Straus’ opposition to a “bathroom bill.”Steve Riggle, a pastor to a congregation of more than 20,000 at Grace Community Church in Houston and a member of the Pastor Council, said he and others are talking about “how in the world do we have 90-some Republicans [in the 150-member Texas House] who won’t stand behind what they say they believe.”“They’re more afraid of Straus than they are of us,” he said. “It’s about time they’re more afraid of us.”“This is not over”In early August, in the midst of the special session, Welch and dozens of other pastors descended on Austin. Hundreds of pastors had signed a letter in support of the bathroom legislation, and before heading inside, the group that had made the trip gathered on the Capitol steps for a brief rally.Throughout his campaign for a bathroom bill, Welch has enjoyed easy access to the state’s elected officials. He hosted a policy briefing in February that featured, among others, Patrick and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton. The August rally, which the Texas Pastor Council had promoted as a response to “opponents of God’s created order,” was no exception.State Rep. Ron Simmons, R-Carrollton, and state Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham, the authors of bathroom bills in their chambers, both spoke to the importance of the bill as Welch acted as the effective emcee of the event, leading the crowd in chants of “Let the House vote.”  “We’re going to take this letter to the House as the voice of the state of Texas and our churches today,” Welch said.But even as he represents pastors across the state, Welch and his work enjoy far from unanimous support from Christian and other religious leaders. During the regular session, about 50 faith leaders of various denominations lined the stairs outside the Texas House in protest of bills targeting LGBT Texans.And just days before Welch arrived in Austin for the rally this month, dozens of religious leaders gathered in the very same spot to denounce the bill as discriminatory and hypocritical. In front of a crowd of more than one hundred supporters, an imam from Austin, as well as pastors and rabbis from across the state spoke about how their faith led them to oppose the legislation.For Steve Wells, a self-described conservative pastor at the South Main Baptist Church in Houston, the campaign for the “bathroom bill” represents “bad theology.” He says he wishes that Welch and other like-minded pastors would focus more on the common dignity granted human beings.“You will never in your lifetime meet someone who was not created in the image of God,” he said.And in July, leaders of the national Episcopal Church sent a letter to Strausasking him to remain “steadfast” in his opposition to the legislation, also denouncing it as discriminatory.Terri Burke, the executive director of the ACLU in Texas, described the “bathroom bill” as the latest frontier for far-right groups opposed to LGBT rights. Now that sexual orientation is largely protected under the law, she said, gender identity has become a target.“I think those who want to discriminate have figured out LGB are hard to discriminate against, so they’ve pulled the T out,” she said.To Welch and his fellow members on the Pastor Council, though, the group’s positions are is well in line with the teachings of the Bible. And even if the death of the “bathroom bill” in the special session represents the loss of a single battle, the broader war continues. “This is not over,” Riggle said.Disclosure: The Texas Freedom Network has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune. A complete list of Tribune donors and sponsors is available here. Marjorie Kamys Cotera | Texas TribuneDave Welch speaks during a press conference in favor of a bathroom bill at the Texas Capitol near the end of the special session on August 14, 2017.A day before the Texas Legislature ended its special session this week, a session that included a high-profile fight over a “bathroom bill” that appeared almost certainly dead, David Welch had a message for Gov. Greg Abbott: call lawmakers back to Austin. Again.For years, Welch, executive director of the Texas Pastor Council, has worked to pass a bill that would ban local policies that ensured transgender individuals’ right to use restrooms in public schools and government buildings that match their gender identity. The summer special session, which was quickly coming to a close, had been Welch and other social conservatives’ second chance, an overtime round after the bill — denounced by critics as discriminatory and unnecessary — failed during the regular session that ended in May.  But with the Texas House unlikely to vote on a bathroom bill, Welch gathered with some of the most conservative Republicans in that chamber to make a final plea. The bill, they argued without any evidence, would prevent men from entering bathrooms to sexually assault or harass women.“If this does not pass during this special session, we are asking for, urgently on behalf of all these pastors across the state of Texas, that we do hold a second special session until the job is done,” Welch said at the press event, hosted by Texas Values, a socially conservative group. Though the group of lawmakers, religious leaders and activists were still coming to terms with their failure to get a bill to Abbott’s desk, for Welch’s Pastor Council, the years-long fight over bathroom restrictions has nonetheless been a galvanizing campaign.The group, which Welch founded in 2003, has grown from a local organization to a burgeoning statewide apparatus with eyes on someday becoming a nationwide force, one able to mobilize conservative Christians around the country into future political battles. If Abbott doesn’t call lawmakers back for another special session to pass a bathroom bill, the group is likely to shift its attention to the 2018 elections. “Our role in this process shouldn’t be restricted just because people attend church,” Welch told The Texas Tribune. “Active voting, informed voting, is a legitimate ministry of the church.”A pastor for pastorsWelch has made a career out of mixing the religious and the political. Before founding the Pastors Council, he spent time at the Christian Coalition and Vision America, a controversial national evangelical group led by Rick Scarborough, a Texas pastor. And just before he founded the Pastor Council, Welch briefly worked as the executive director of the Republican Party in Harris County, where he would get to know many of the politicians that would animate his later campaigns. Welch said he has known Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, one of the most outspoken proponents of a bathroom bill in state government, since he was a radio host in Houston.But it was with the Pastor Council — at first a small group of Houston pastors — that Welch would begin to make his deepest mark in Texas politics.“We formed the Houston area pastor council in 2003 as a group of 12 pastors, across racial and denominational lines, to engage together on a variety of social moral cultural issues,” he said.last_img read more

Patreon Now Has Over 3 Million Patrons Expects to Pay 500M to

first_img Popular on Variety This year, Patreon wants to simplify sending out physical goods to patrons with its own merchandise solution, it announced Wednesday. And last year, Patreon acquired Memberful to offer bigger artists a chance to provide membership services through their own websites.While Patreon is growing, it is also increasingly getting competition from other platforms looking to offer creators alternative revenue streams in addition to advertising. For instance, Facebook started testing paid memberships last March, and both Twitter and YouTube have been allowing live streamers to raise funding from their audiences.However, this clearly hasn’t stopped fans from using Patreon to support their favorite creators. The service’s number of patrons increased by 1 million in 2018, Patreon announced Wednesday. Membership services platform Patreon now has more than 3 million patrons who pay to support any of its over 100,000 creators every month, the company announced Wednesday. It’s also on track to pay more than $0.5 billion to creators this year.Patreon’s business is growing at a healthy rate. Payouts have been nearly doubling year-over-year for the past few years, and the company expects to surpass $1 billion in total payouts this year. In other words: Patreon will pay as much to creators this year as it has paid since its launch six years ago.Patreon has been primarily targeting smaller and independent creators, ranging from musicians to podcasters. The company is offering these creators an easy solution to ask their fans for monthly membership fees, and give them special content as well as other perks in exchange.center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Windpowered car goes down wind faster than the wind

first_img More information: Thin Air Designs blog: www.fasterthanthewind.org/via Autopia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Wind-powered car goes down wind faster than the wind (2010, June 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-wind-powered-car-faster.html (PhysOrg.com) — A wind-powered car has been clocked in the US traveling down wind faster than the wind. In a recent run at New Jerusalem in Tracy, California, the car reached a top speed of more than 2.85 times faster than the wind blowing at the time (13.5 mph) powered by the wind itself. The run should now settle the DWFTTW (down wind faster than the wind) debate that has been raging for some time on the Internet about whether or not such a feat was possible. Explore further Smart wind turbines can predict the windcenter_img Cavallaro explained the car is able to move faster than the wind because the propeller is not turned by the wind. The wind pushes the vehicle forward, and once moving the wheels turn the propeller. The propeller spins in the opposite direction to that expected, pushing the wind backwards, which in turn pushes the car forwards, turning the wheels, and thus turning the propeller faster still.The vehicle was built after over a year of trials. Building a transmission able to transfer power from the wheels to the propeller was the most difficult part of the design. The next stage in development will be to have trials confirmed by NALSA. The Thin Air Designs car, called the Blackbird, was built by Rick Cavallaro, an aerodynamicist, paraglider and kitesurfer, who was alerted to the DWFTTW debate by his employer at Sportvision Inc., Stan Honey, a world-class sailing navigator. Cavallaro is chief scientist with the company. He made some calculations that convinced him the feat was possible and then built a model to prove it. When skeptics remained unconvinced, Cavallaro and a friend decided to build a full-size version.The “Faster than the Wind” team was able to attract sponsorship from wind turbine company Joby Energy and Google, and worked in collaboration with the aero department of the San Jose State University to build their ultra-light vehicle, which is made largely of foam. The car has a passing resemblance to a Formula 1 racing car, except for the five meter high propeller mounted on the back, and it is this propeller that holds the key to how it is possible for the car to travel down wind faster than the wind. An earlier version known as the BUFC for Big Ugly Cart (fill in the blank), also achieved speeds greater than the down wind speed at the North American Land Sailing Association (NALSA) meeting on a dry lakebed in Nevada in March. Image credit: Thin Air Designs © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

We are about feel good music

first_imgSantana seems to have given Delhi a taste for rock for sure. And now Delhiites will get a chance to listen to Five 8 — a glam / Progressive Rock band from the city. The band has Robin Mathew on vocals, Aveleon Vaz on drums, Pranav on guitars, Steve Peter on bass and Shiv Ahuja on keyboards. Millennium Post caught up with the band members before their performance. Here are excerpts from an interview:How did all of you get together? We were all a part of the Kirori Mal College Music Society where the band was initially formed in 2005. But it was only in 2007 that we started playing our own music in the Delhi University circuit. After graduating, we started doing gigs in pubs. Our band was started with the idea of performing our own music and of course we also did a few covers. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’How would you define your music?Essentially it is pop funk as a genre. Our music is all about feel good music. It is hip,  happy, funky. Overall, it is about having a good time.What will you be performing today? E.P. and some of our new compositions. This time we have also roped in Pranav for guitars in place of our official guitarist, who is studying music in Chennai.What is the USP of your band?The fact that our sound is ever evolving. We keep innovating our songs and also rework our older numbers. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixWhy Five 8?Actually, Five 8 is a musical term, a time signature. It was once during a competition that our drummer randomly played the Five 8 and we are kind of stuck with it ever since. It is just that we never decided to change it since.Who composes the music? Also what story does it tell? Most of our lyrics is written by Robin Mathew, our vocalist and the drummer Aveleon Vaz. But all of us contribute to the lyrics. Earlier, we wrote on everything under the sun. But over time, we started focusing on our surroundings and added critical commentary about the society. Tell us one thing your band is completely addicted to…Food. We draw our inspiration when we hang out together and food is one factor we cannot do without. When we jam we go to our drummer Aveleon’s house where his parents are quite supportive. He is a Goan and his mother cooks us a lot of Goan dishes.What next?More gigs. This time of the year is really busy so probably more gigs. Also as a band, we do not have high and lofty ideas of conquering the world music, but this is not to say we are not serious. We take music very seriously but for us it is all about having a quality time jamming and creating good music. DETAILAt: Hard Rock Cafe, DLF Place, Saket When: 15 NovemberTimings: 9 pm onwards Phone: 47158888last_img read more