Light rains end sultry spell in city

first_imgNew Delhi: Light rains on Sunday brought Delhiites some respite from a long spell of sultry weather with the maximum temperature settling at 33.5 degrees Celsius, one notch below the season’s average.The minimum temperature settled at 26.4 degrees Celsius, a Meteorological Department official said. The Safdarjung Observatory, which provides official figures for the city, recorded 0.4 mm rains till 5.30 pm, the MeT official said. The humidity oscillated between 85 and 63 per cent. The weatherman forecast a maximum temperature of 34 degrees Celsius and minimum 25 degrees for Monday with generally cloudy sky and light rain or thunderstorms.The maximum and minimum temperatures on Saturday were recorded as 37 degrees and 29.1 degrees Celsius respectively.last_img

Manitoba RCMP finds burned vehicle of men wanted in connection with three

first_imgGILLAM, Manitoba (NEWS 1130) – As the nation-wide manhunt continues in the search for the two Vancouver Island men wanted in connection with three deaths in northern B.C., the Manitoba RCMP says it has found the vehicle the two were travelling in.A woman who works near Gillam, Manitoba also says she spoke with them.On Tuesday, the RCMP said they had “reason to believe” Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19, had been spotted in the rural community in that province’s north. At a news conference on Wednesday, Cpl. Julie Courchaine said the grey 2011 Toyota RAV 4 the suspects had been travelling in was found burned near Gillam on Monday night.“Based on this information, we have sent a number of resources to the Gillam area,” she said. “There will be a heavier police presence in the community.”Mychelle Keeper, who works at a gas station in Split Lake just outside Gillam, said the two Port Alberni men bought gas from her on Monday.”There’s a big sign at the truck stop there, no bootleggers or drug dealers, he was asking about that. I said ‘no, it’s not allowed here because it’s a dry community.’ That’s it. They paid for their gas and they left,” adds Keeper, who says they didn’t seem suspicious. @NEWS1130— Monika Gul (@MonikaGul) July 24, 2019“They both stopped in, and they came to my till and he just asked to gas up $20,” Keeper said. “And that Bryer guy, he asked me ‘Is alcohol allowed here in the community?’ because there’s a big sign at the truck stop there, ‘No bootleggers or drug dealers,’ he was asking about that. I said ‘No, it’s not allowed here because it’s a dry community.’ That’s it. They paid for their gas and they left.”She said they didn’t seem suspicious and added it wasn’t until Tuesday, when Schmegelsky and McLeod were named suspects in the deaths of two tourists and an unidentified man in northern B.C., that she realized she’d had a brush with accused killers.“After I realized that it was them, I felt really scared,” Keeper said.Lucas Robertson Fowler and Chynna Noelle Deese were found dead by the side of a highway in northeaster B.C. on Monday, July 15, 2019. (Source: B.C. RCMP)The pair is wanted for questioning in connection with the double homicide of Australian Lucas Fowler and his American girlfriend Chynna Deese, whose bodies were found alongside the Alaska Highway near Liard Hot Springs in northern B.C. on Monday, July 15. The RCMP says the couple had been shot.They are also wanted for questioning in connection with the suspicious death of an unidentified man, whose body was found near the suspects’ burned-out vehicle around Dease Lake, about 470 kilometres from where Fowler and Deese’s bodies were found.Mounties have released a composite sketch of an unidentified man found dead in northern B.C. near the burned out vehicle of suspects Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19. The RCMP is hoping the public can help identify him. (Source: B.C. RCMP)A burned-out vehicle was later found near Gillam, on the territory of the Fox Lake Cree Nation, shortly after Mounties in Manitoba reported a possible sighting of the pair. At the press conference on Wednesday afternoon, Courchaine confirmed it was the RAV 4 McLeod and Schmegelsky had been travelling in. Officers recovered the vehicle after receiving reports of a car on fire near the reserve.“Many community members may be aware of a Canada wide warrant issued by the RCMP regarding two individuals who may be in the Gillam area,” Chief Walter Spence said in an emailed statement. “A vehicle was burned and discarded near our reserve of Bird today. An all night patrol for the community has been prepared as a caution. The RCMP are carefully conducting their work with a large presence and I would like to ask all community members to report anything of concern directly to RCMP.”Suspects would ‘stand out’, mayor of Gillam saysBoasting a population of just over 1,000 people, Gillam, Manitoba is one of the last communities before the northbound highway ends.Gillam Mayor Dwayne Forman told NEWS 1130 when he heard Schmegelsky and McLeod may have been in the small town, he was “more or less” confused.“I don’t know why anyone – if they were coming this way, why would they come to Gillam?” he said. “It’s a dead end road. Doesn’t make sense.”Forman asked that locals take precautions, like locking doors, on the “chance that they are in the area.”“Through social media, there’s been definitely a lot of expression of fear and the fear is understandable,” he said. “I too want to take the same steps. I want everybody in this community to be safe, I want everyone in Fox Lake to be safe.”He said locals know one another, and the pair would stand out.“We only have approximately 1,100 people in the area,” Forman said. “We all know each other. For the most part, anyone that’s new to the area stands out, and we’d be able to identify if somebody was walking around the community.”Gillam, the town where the duo were apparently last seen in is about an 11 hour drive north of Winnipeg. Very remote area with hundreds of km’s separating communities and the odd gas stations. I used to live in nearby Thompson and this is most of the drive up north. @NEWS1130 pic.twitter.com/SoH4YcBA9r— Monika Gul (@MonikaGul) July 24, 2019The area around Gillam and the Fox Lake Cree Nation, about 1,000 kilometres north of Winnipeg, is surrounded by hundreds of kilometres of deep forest and small bodies of water.Since the sighting was confirmed, Manitoba RCMP have set up informational check-points and have increased the police presence in the area.Forman hopes the two men are caught soon, and that they aren’t in the area of his community.Suspects considered extremely dangerousSchmegelsky and McLeod, first reported missing this week, are considered extremely dangerous, and the RCMP is urging anyone who sees them not to approach but to call 9-1-1 immediately.McLeod is described as being 6’4″ tall, weighs about 169 lbs, has dark hair and facial hair, and brown eyes. Schmegelsky is also 6’4″ tall, weighs about 169 lbs, and has sandy brown hair.“This investigation is very complex and ever evolving,” B.C. RCMP Sgt. Janelle Shoihet said Tuesday, and investigators continue to receive new information from the public.last_img read more

THE TRAILER FOR THE HARRY MEGHAN MOVIE IS HERE

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement We’re five weeks away from the royal wedding, but there’s another exciting deadline on the horizon for those of us who didn’t receive an invite: Harry & Meghan: A Royal Romance premieres in four weeks, and we finally have a chance to see Parisa Fitz-Henley and Murray Fraser in action as the actress-turned-duchess and London’s favourite prince.The teaser is short but sweet, and it gives us even more confidence in the casting decisions that were announced back in February. Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Twitterlast_img

US authorities targeting TorontoNew York City Chinese human smuggling network using Akwesasne

first_img(Screen grab of search warrant affidavit to examining cell phones seized during Aug. 11 arrest of 3 Chinese nationals)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsU.S. federal authorities are trying to dismantle a smuggling network moving Chinese nationals from Toronto to New York City through the Mohawk community of Akwesasne which straddles the Canada-U.S. border, court documents show.The smuggling network advertises its services by publishing ads in Chinese-language newspapers sold in the Toronto-area. The ads include the phone number of a broker who sets up the smuggling run, according to court documents filed with the U.S. Federal Court Northern New York District.Akwesasne, a Mohawk community straddling the Ontario, Quebec and New York State borders, is often used by networks trying to smuggle people from Canada into the U.S.The geographic location of Akwesasne, with a portion of the St. Lawrence River running through it, makes it an attractive area to attempt runs across the border. It is possible to take a boat from the northern shore of the St. Lawrence River to the southern shore of the St. Regis Village or Snye areas of Akwesasne and then walk across unguarded portions of the international boundary into the U.S.U.S. authorities have recently turned their attention to a network smuggling Chinese nationals from Toronto to New York City.The U.S. Border Patrol filed three search warrant affidavits last Thursday with the Federal Court to conduct forensic examinations of cell phones and a GPS device seized during the Aug. 11 arrest of three Chinese nationals who were on U.S. soil illegally. The three individuals were in a 2013 white Honda Pilot SUV with New York State plates that was stopped by the U.S. Border Patrol shortly after it left the Akwesasne Mohawk Casino.Court documents show U.S. Border Patrol investigators are trying to dismantle the Chinese smuggling network through leads unearthed by examining the seized cells phones and GPS device.Investigators are currently focusing on a Chinese national named Wanxiang Chen, the driver of the SUV, who admitted to authorities he had successfully transported seven people in three previous trips from Akwesasne to New York City, according to court documents.Chen, who lives between the Brooklyn and Queens boroughs of the city, was also found by authorities to be residing in the U.S. illegally.A U.S. Federal Court judge has ordered Chen’s two passengers, Lili Cai and Kang Shen Shi, to appear as material witnesses against Chen during trial.Cai and Shi’s immigration status in Canada remains unclear.U.S. Border Patrol investigators turned their sights on Chen after obtaining information following a raid of a home in Akwesasne in July and from the cooperation of an individual facing alien smuggling charges. Investigators were tipped off to a smuggling operation involving Chinese nationals set for July 27.  This eventually led them to Chen’s Honda SUV, according to court documents.When Chen returned on Aug. 11, Border Patrol agents were ready.Court documents reviewed by APTN formed a partial snapshot of how the smuggling operation worked and it began with the newspaper ad.Cai told investigators that she phoned the number in the newspaper ad. The man who answered the phone set up the operation and arranged transport from the Toronto area to a marina on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River. The trip would cost Cai $8,000.Cai told investigators she was transported across the river, but the documents provided no details on how she ended up at the Akwesasne Mohawk Casino, which sits on the U.S. side of the community, where she was eventually picked-up by Chen.Previous human smuggling cases, however, revealed that smuggled individuals are usually hidden in a home in the community after they are taken by boat across the river. They are then spirited to a spot on the outskirts of the reserve for the final leg of the trip to New York City or other points. In one case last year, an Akwesasne resident bought bus tickets for two Chinese nationals for the trip to New York City.After Cai phoned the number in the newspaper, a man from a “travel agency” in New York City contacted Chen to travel to the casino for the pick-up. It would be his fourth trip. Chen told authorities he was paid $900 cash for each trip by a man who handed the money over on a street corner in the city.This time, however, Border Patrol agents were watching as he drove his SUV into the parking lot of the casino and through the valet parking area near the entrance to pick up Cai and Shi. The SUV left the casino at 12:56 p.m. It was tracked and pulled-over at 1:06 p.m. on State Route 37 as Chen and his occupants travelled through Fort Covington, NY.Chen, who is in custody, is scheduled for trial which is scheduled to begin Nov. 9 in Syracuse, NY.None of the allegations contained in the court documents have been proven in court.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

President appoints committee to study Singapore – Sri Lanka FTA

Following concerns raised, President Maithripala Sirisena appointed an independent committee to study and compile a report on the Singapore – Sri Lanka Free Trade Agreement.The committee will consist of prominent economists and will be chaired by former Vice-Chancellor of Colombo University, Deshamanya Professor W.D. Lakshman. Former Professor of Economics at the Open University Prof. Sirimevan Colombage, former Professor of Economics of the University of Kelaniya Prof. Ajitha Tennakoon, economic consultant Dr. Sanath Jayanetti and former Assistant Governor of Central Bank R.A. Jayatissa have been appointed as members of the committee. (Colombo Gazette)

Jaguar Land Rover announces 800 jobs in the UK

In 2013, Jaguar Land Rover will continue to implement its ambitious plans for growth and has announced a recruitment campaign to create 800 new jobs in the UK to support the introduction of future model programmes. More than 200 of these roles are supported by the UK Government’s Regional Growth Fund.The recruitment campaign for production operators is underway at Jaguar Land Rover’s advanced manufacturing plant in Solihull, West Midlands.Jaguar Land Rover has recently confirmed a £370 million ($600million) investment programme for its Solihull site which includes the installation of a new aluminium body shop for the all-new Range Rover as well as upgrades to paint-applications technologies, trim assembly, warehousing and Jaguar Land Rover’s first customer handover centre.In the last two years, Jaguar Land Rover has embarked on the most ambitious recruitment campaign in the company’s history, hiring 8,000 people. It now employs 25,000 people globally.Details of the new roles along with other current vacancies at Jaguar Land Rover can be found at: www.jaguarlandrovercareers.comClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

Church not immune to abuse cases

first_imgArchbishop Stylianos has revealed the Greek Orthodox Church is not immune to child sex abuse cases a week after the Church fronted the Victorian parliamentary inquiry on the issue denying culpability. The Archbishop believes that no religious organisation is immune, as the pattern of abuse isn’t an organisational problem, but a human one. “Religious organisations, which consist of human beings, even as clergymen, can never be regarded in advance as immune of such criminal acts,” he told Neos Kosmos. At the inquiry, Bishop Iakovos of Miletoupolis denied there were any cases of child sex abuse by Greek orthodox clergyman in Victoria and affirmed there were no attempts at cover up or “sweep under the carpet anything serious”. But, as The Age reported this week, the Bishop “misled” the inquiry, saying there is at least one case where a priest has been charged for indecently assaulting a minor. In a letter, the paper was informed of one case in 2002 where a priest was found guilty for indecently assaulting a teenage girl. ”This case is well known among the hierarchy of the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia, and information about it is even available online,” the letter says. The Greek Orthodox Church keeps records of its clergymen and complaints against them. Bishop Iakovos said to The Age the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese had not deliberately misled any inquiry. It had ”made a submission relevant to the inquiry identifying one case on public record”. At the inquiry Bishop Iakovos said he was ”officially not aware of any child sexual abuse cases in living memory”. During the inquiry, Bishop Iakovos mentioned the Church has a strong relationship with Victoria police and would report any crimes directly but didn’t explain the church’s protocols. Putting the question to the Archbishop, he said the Church has its own protocols in receiving, investigating and resolving any complaints, but hadn’t introduced any new rules for dealing with abuse cases. “If a complaint is made, the local Bishop immediately convenes to the Code of Conduct Council, and investigates the complaint,” Archbishop Stylianos explains. “The respondent is notified, the complainant is offered counselling/support services. If a mutual resolution cannot be reached, the matter is then referred to the Archbishop who may refer the matter to a canonical court for final determination. Finally, if criminal conduct is established, the church must refer the matter to the police authorities. The archbishop will then take disciplinary action based on the severity of the complaint.” There were only two cases of priests being defrocked in Victoria, and they had nothing to do with abuse. One of the priests was defrocked for taking marriage licence fees. For the Church, fronting such an inquiry has shone a negative light on the actions of its clergymen, but the Archbishop doesn’t feel their reputation has been tarnished. “There is no reason for the Church to feel that its reputation has, in any way, been tarnished by the parliamentary inquiry… on the contrary, as a Church, we welcome the inquiry and will support and cooperate with the initiative,” the Archbishop said. “It’s important that a national best practice standards framework is established to mitigate such terrible acts for the future not only in religious institutions but others as well.” During the inquiry, experts have savaged the Catholic Church’s response to clergy sex abuse, including claims such as that one in 15 Melbourne priests is a child abuser, that Catholic priests offend at six times the rate of all other churches put together, and that the Church’s protocols are designed to protect the church rather than help victims. Police have said the Catholic Church had dissuaded victims from reporting crimes to police, alerted suspects about allegations, moved or protected suspects and never reported a single case to police. Archbishop Sytlianos famously argued recently that the Catholic Church’s sex scandals could be avoided if the priests were able to get married. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Wijnaldum Van Dijk has made a real difference at Liverpool

first_imgLiverpool midfielder Georginio Wijnaldum hailed the impact Virgil van Dijk has made in the club’s defence upon his arrival in JanuaryThe Reds signed Van Dijk for a record £75m fee for a defender in the last winter transfer window from fellow Premier League side Southampton.Since then, Van Dijk has become a crucial member of the Liverpool defence with his solid displays helping the club concede just five times in 12 Premier League matches.And Wijnaldum believes a large part of the credit should go to his fellow Dutchman.“I think Virgil has made a difference in the last line because he is a good defender, a big defender,” Wijnaldum told the club website.“He is an extra man who can defend set-pieces as well.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“He is a leader in the last line who not only helps himself with his quality but also the players next to him and so he really helps the team.“But it is not only Virgil, the team helps him also – the players who play next to him or in front of him and the goalkeeper too because we all have to communicate with each other and help each other.“It is good teamwork that makes us do things so well, but of course he has made a real difference since he came.”Van Dijk has made 16 appearances for Liverpool in all competitions this season.Jurgen Klopp’s side will travel to Watford for their next Premier League match on November 24.last_img read more

At Google workers town hall employees pledge to protect each other from

first_imgGoogle workers staged a worldwide walkout last year. James Martin/CNET Google workers on Friday held a town hall meeting to discuss alleged retaliation from the search giant over employees’ activism and organizing efforts. The company’s employees booked rooms for viewing the town hall from Google offices all over the world, according to an employee who attended the meeting. At the gathering, Google workers pledged to protect each other from retaliation and brainstormed ideas to help. Some of that action could take place as soon as next week, that employee said.That employee also said it was the first big town hall meeting that Google’s temporary workers, vendors and contractors — known as TVCs in Google parlance — were able to attend, since the gathering was held by employees and not management.The meeting was called after two workers who helped to organize a massive employee walkout said management was unfairly targeting them. In November, roughly 20,000 Googlers walked out of the company’s offices worldwide to protest its handling of sexual assault allegations directed at key executives. The demonstration drew international attention. One organizer, Meredith Whittaker, who leads Google’s Open Research program, said earlier this week that she was asked to choose between Google and her outside work. Whittaker co-founded New York University’s AI Now Institute, a research center that examines the societal effects of artificial intelligence. Whittaker said Google asked her to give up that work after the company disbanded its own AI ethics board last month amid controversy over one of its members. Claire Stapleton, a marketing manager at Google-owned YouTube, said she was told after the walkout she’d be demoted and lose half of her reports. She said she was also told to go on medical leave even though she wasn’t sick. Google only walked back her demotion after she hired a lawyer, Stapleton said. “Meredith and Claire were bold and unwavering,” the employee who attended said. “The support was overwhelming and it looks like the company’s misguided gamble to cut off the ‘head’ of the organizing against harassment, discrimination and unethical decision-making won’t work.”Google employees have largely been the poster children for protest in the tech industry — a sector where rank and file workers have historically refrained from publicly criticizing management. Aside from the handling of sexual assault accusations, Google workers have also protested the company’s military contracts, its work in China, and its treatment of temporary workers and contractors. Outside of Google, other tech workers have also been speaking up. At Amazon, thousands of workers signed a letter earlier this month that urged the company to reduce its carbon footprint and take action against climate change.The town hall meeting comes a day after Google released its workplace policy guidelines, including its rules on retaliation. Retaliation means taking an adverse action against an employee or TVC as a consequence of reporting, for expressing an intent to report, for assisting another employee in an effort to report, for testifying or assisting in a proceeding involving sexual harassment under any federal, state or local anti-discrimination law, or for participating in the investigation of what they believe in good faith to be a possible violation of our Code of Conduct, Google policy or the law. The section concludes by warning employees that not all complaints may meet that definition.”If you report something that is not a policy violation and you believe you are being treated adversely as a result, you should feel free to report that and we will look into it, but it may not amount to retaliation under this policy,” the guidelines say.Google declined to comment on the town hall, but a spokeswoman said the company prohibits retaliation and has a “very clear policy.” “To make sure that no complaint raised goes unheard at Google, we give employees multiple channels to report concerns, including anonymously, and investigate all allegations of retaliation,” the spokeswoman said.    Post a comment Google employees protest tech giant’s handling of sexual… Share your voice 0 Google Alphabet Inc.center_img 1:45 Tags Tech Industry Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

I ate insects at ComicCon and now I want more

first_imgAnd now you know where to find cricket protein bars at Comic-Con. Erin Carson/CNET In the press room at San Diego Comic-Con, early Thursday evening, it’s snack time. Well, for me at least. At the risk of spoiling my dinner, I’m digging into a very particular type of protein bar — the kind that’s going to power me through my last story of the day, in more ways than one.The bar, brown and moist, is meant to taste like peanut butter and strawberry jelly. In truth, biting in you’d think that’s all that was in it. But along with the real strawberries and bits of peanut, this bar also contains crickets. Cricket powder, to be precise.Now, I’m not sitting here eating a cricket protein bar because I hate convention food that much. Share your voice 62 Photos Culture Comments The very best cosplay we saw at Comic-Con 2019 5 Now playing: Watch this: It’s actually in promotion of the upcoming TBS television series Snowpiercer. Snowpiercer is a TV adaption of a comic (it was also a movie in 2014) slated for 2020. The show takes place a few years after the world has become a frozen wasteland. A train carries what remains of humanity, and even in the apocalypse there’s a disparity between the folks in the fancy front of the train and the ones barely getting by in the back.And by barely getting by, we’re talking about subsisting off nutrient bars of jellied cockroaches.Fortunately, the protein bar that Comic-Con goers can pick up from one of several vending machines is nothing like that. Tragically, it’s not made with cockroaches. It’s also pretty good — dense, chewy, a bit crunchy, the strawberry lends a fresh note, and it doesn’t taste like, well, crickets.snowpiercer2.jpgMmm… crickets. Erin Carson/CNET As for the idea of subsisting on protein bars, I get it. When I arrive at the Snowpiercer booth on the expo floor at 4:30 p.m. PT, I’ve eaten two caramel toffee sea salt bars and nothing else all day long. The world might not have frozen over, but these are, nonetheless, meager times on the food front in the midst of a 130,000-plus person convention with entirely too much to take in.To get the cricket bar, you go up to a vending machine with a giant touchscreen, and enter your email address, watch a short video from Snowpiercer, and down drops a cricket protein bar in a black wrapper with blue and white lettering.Scarfing down a bug bar isn’t just a promotional stunt. The bars come from the Aspire Food Group, a company based in Austin, Texas that raises crickets for human consumption. Aspire’s been on a mission to educate people about how edible insects like crickets are often higher in iron, protein, calcium and the like, and are also a more environmentally sustainable source of nutrients, than meat. And since Snowpiercer is essentially dealing with the aftermath of climate change, Aspire CEO and co-founder Mohammed Ashour thinks it’s a point worth underlining.”The show talks about a dystopian future where as a result of a lot of social collapses, you end up in this world where there’s this asymmetry in how nutrition and wealth and abundance and opportunity is distributed,” Ashour said. That’s not merely science fiction. “We are using tremendous amounts of resources to produce nutrition calories at an incredible environmental cost.”Can swapping out steak for some crickets keep us all off the apocalypse train? That remains to be seen, but Ashour is hoping Comic-Con’s attendees will consider it.And hey — at least it’s not cockroaches. Whole roasted crickets infest snack time Tags 3:04 Comic-Conlast_img read more

Chevak Artist Receives a Rasmuson Award

first_imgLisa Unin, a resident of Chevak, has received an award from the Rasmuson Foundation for her traditional Cup’ik parkas.Using this money, Unin will make two full-sized parkas.Lisa Unin of Chevak. -Photo courtesy of the Rasmuson FoundationWhen she found out she’d received the award, Lisa Unin felt shocked.“At first I couldn’t swallow it because I didn’t expect to get an award. Later on I was getting excited and more excited,” said Unin.Unin, a resident of Chevak, received a Rasmuson Project Award of $7,500. Using this money Unin will make two full-sized parkas. She will speak with elders on how they make the traditional Alaska Native jackets. Once her parkas are completed, Unin will donate them to Alaska museums.The sealskin and seal gut parkas will be the first Unin will make large enough for a person. Unin typically makes miniature clothes for the dolls her husband makes. She started making these around the age of thirty.Jayson Smart, with the Rasmuson Foundation, says they choose to give Unin a Project Award because of her commitment to preserving Native culture.“Overall I think that the panel who reviewed her application was really struck by her commitment to looking at this specific art form and evaluating the importance of trying to keep it alive and supporting somebody like Lisa who’s incredibly skilled at what she does as a skin sewer and in this traditional art form,” said Smart.The Rasmuson Foundation works to improve the quality of life in Alaska through art. Each year Rasmuson names twenty-five Project Awards, ten Fellows, and one Distinguished Artist. Unin shared the Project Awards with a variety of different types of artists, from traditional Native craftspeople to classical musicians to contemporary sculptors.last_img read more

As Fires Burn Agencies Coordinate Helicopters to Gift Cards for Relief

first_imgDownload AudioCombating the wildfires breaking out across the Alaska involves a mix of local, state, and federal resources. But amid organizational and financial complexities, most of the immediate needs on the ground are quite basic.A level below ground in the National Guard Armory at Joint Base Elmendorf Richardson, the State’s Emergency Operation Center is a hive of computer monitors, flat-screen TVs, and telephones.“Our job is not to fight fires,” said Michael O’Hare, Director of the state’s Emergency Management division. “Our job is to make sure the fire-fighters are putting the fires out.”Front-line fire fighting is overseen by the Division of Forestry–they’re the ones calling in crews of hot-shots or phoning into the National Guard for helicopters.By contrast, the EOC feels a bit like a big tent, with representatives fielding phone calls and connecting folks in the Mat-Su or Kenai Boroughs with things they need right away: cots, blankets, pillows, sanitation kits.”The Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management also handles the next phase of the recovery process: Disaster Assistance. That phase started Wednesday, as Borough officials went out with state Troopers to do windshield checks, spotting which properties are damaged. That information will eventually be used by the state in providing funds to home-owners for repairs, and bringing in Federal FEMA money if the destruction is beyond the Borough or state’s ability to pay.“Natural disasters are always very expensive, particularly in Alaska,” said Bryan Fisher, who, as Incident Manager, is at the nexus for all the agencies and levels of government involved. He and his staff wear red vests so that outside partners can tell who’s on the emergency management team. Surrounded by logistics and complexity, Fisher insists his job is simple: support the local jurisdictions.At the center of all this is Bryan Fisher, who wears a red vest so that officials from a wide array of outside agencies know he’s part of the emergency management team. Fisher says his job is simple: support the local jurisdictions.In a complicated crisis situation, just having the room and the know-how to coordinate is key. Emergency managers handling the wildfires are on-call for 12-hour shifts seven days a week. Fisher says having the capacity to navigate all the available resources frees up front-line crews, dealing with everything from fire suppression to evacuations.“The state of Alaska does not forcibly evacuate anybody, from from anywhere,” Fisher said. “If the homeowner or resident chooses not to leave, (firefighters) take information down on who they are, where they are, and next of kin to be able to notify if, godforbid, something should happen.”Those serious conversations are a huge challenge.“The firefighter’s primary mission is to save lives and protect property. And having to be a stranger and come in to say ‘we need you to leave now and if you don’t you’re on your own because we have to protect ourselves, and protect all the rest of the property and homeowners in the area where the fire is’ is (a) very, very difficult conversation to have.”Officials and relief workers are seeing donations come in, but want Alaskans to know that not all charity is equal when it comes to having the best impact.Relief agencies helping the state manage shelter and aid refer to something called “the disaster within the disaster.” What they mean is that well-meaning Alaskans rush out to donate goods that end up being more of a burden than a help.“The thing there’s too much of right now is clothing,” said Tom Gemmel, who works with the Red Cross, which is helping take care of the more than 90 evacuees staying at a shelter in Houston. Red Cross and other groups like the Salvation Army connect individuals with particular needs like eye-glasses, medications, and short-term housing. But they do it through gift certificates and deals with hotels–which depend on cash.If you want to help but don’t feel comfortable opening your wallet, you should still probably keep the green-beans and old sheets on the shelf.“The best thing people can do,” Gemmel explained, “is prepare themselves for disaster, because you’re pretty useless as a disaster volunteer if you’re worried about your own family.”Once the state begins its damage assessment phase, officials will have a clearer picture of specific needs.last_img read more

Mumbai man arrested for repeatedly raping daughter for months

first_img[Representational image] Creative CommonsIn a horrifying incident, a 62-year-old man sedated and raped his teenaged daughter in Mumbai for a few months. The accused has been arrested.According to the complaint filed by the victim, the father used to mix sedatives in her dinner every night. When she fell unconscious, he would proceed to rape her, reports Times of India.The man works at a private firm and divorced the victim’s mother five years ago. The victim and her younger siblings were staying with their father.The girl fell something amiss since she used to wake up every morning feeling ill and nauseous. She then suspected that her food had something to do with it. Her suspicions increased when her father insisted that she go to her room immediately after dinner every night.However, on the night of March 27, Wednesday, on the pretext that she is unwell, the girl opted to skip dinner. However, her father brought dinner to her room and insisted that she eat. When he left the room, she threw the food away and pretended that she was asleep. A little while later, her father came into the room and raped her. She tried to fight him off and raise an alarm but her father gagged her and threatened her with dire consequences. The girl’s stepmother and siblings were in the next room.The victim, unable to remain silent on the issue, posted her situation on social media and told her friend. The friend then took her to an NGO, who helped her lodge a complaint against her father with the Naya Nagar police in Mumbai.”We arrested him under section 376 (rape) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC). The Thane court remanded him in police custody till April 1,” Kailash Barve, a senior police inspector at the Naya Nagar police station told Hindustan Times.Other IncidentsUnfortunately, another similar took place in Odisha when a 45-year-old man was arrested for raping his 13-year-old daughter earlier this month. The girl, a student of class eight filed a complaint against her father. The police acted on the complaint and arrested the perpetrator. He was charged under many sections of the Indian Penal Code as well as the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act.The father was allegedly raping the little girl repeatedly for a month before she had enough and filed a complaint, reports NDTV.last_img read more

Death Saves DD Streetwear Interview With Designer Damian Higgins

first_imgGeek.com: What are you most proud of after a year of Death Saves?DH: I really love our Death Knight design. I feel that that design with the text at the bottom, the design itself, really hits all the notes for me, for what I want every design to look like. It’s kind of a metal thing, there’s design stuff, cool typography. All the notes are being hit. But I do also really love our Death Knight ring. The guy who did it, Geoff Thomas, he did an incredible job. I’m a big rock jewelry collector and I’m obsessive about anything I’m into. If I’m into it I go all the way down the rabbit hole and I did just that with skull ring manufacturers. And I gotta say, as someone who’s seen pretty much all of it, our Death Knight ring is as good as it gets. It’s better than 99% of anything out there. The fact that I was involved in it is a source of pride for me.More on Geek.com:What Makes a Great Dungeon Master, According to Players at D&D Live 2019Why ‘Dungeons & Dragons Live: The Descent’ Is the Future of ConventionsAll SDCC 2019 Coverage Geek.com: Was the brand called Death Saves at this point?DH: Actually the original name for it was gonna be INVENTORY, but we decided it was too bland of a name. We thought we needed a spicier name, so I probably came up with like, 200 different ideas for names. Some of them were 1981 RPG Club, Death Wizards, and right before we decided on Death Saves we were gonna go with Vision Of Doom. But like, right at high noon Joe decided we should go with something else. We ended up with Death Saves, which has grown on me a ton and I think is ultimately perfect for the brand but I’ve used Vision Of Doom as a tag on like, tee shirts, and Instagram captions a ton.So this is all back in February of 2018. We started realizing that we’d stumbled on a concept that hadn’t been tapped in the market. Nobody was doing fantasy metal streetwear with good graphic design. With Joe’s background as a hardcore fantasy nerd and me being so nerdy about this stuff too, I knew our stuff would come from a pure place rather than some bandwagon-jumping aesthetic. Joe and I try to have an interesting backstory for every design — a lot of thought goes into everything we do and there are a ton of easter eggs throughout the designs. There’s always a story going on in the design. We don’t want to phone anything in.We did a sort of soft-launch at D&D Live: Stream of Many Eyes in May of 2018, just getting the gear seen and getting people to post about it on Instagram, get some hype built. That’s kinda how it started and we’ve been running it for a year. The doors are really starting to open. One of the more exciting moments of last year’s San Diego Comic-Con for Dungeons & Dragons fans was the debut of a dope, new clothing line called Death Saves. Founded by actor Joe Manganiello and designer Damian Higgins, the brand brings an approach to fantasy and roleplaying fandom gear that draws heavily from streetwear and heavy metal. Their first drop was full of instant sellouts and the brand has spent the last year steadily building both its fanbase and inventory.While the brand’s “birthday” was technically back in May, their reappearance at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con feels like an apt anniversary marker. To commemorate a year of Death Saves, Geek.com sat down with head designer Damian Higgins to talk about the influence of streetwear on Death Saves, the company’s origins, and what the future holds in store for it.Geek.com: Let’s start from the beginning: tell us the story of how Death Saves came to be.DAMIAN HIGGINS: Death Saves came to fruition back in February 2018. I was walking down the street in Brooklyn in the rain and got a text from Joe. He told me he’d just acquired the official license from Wizards to create and sell D&D merch and wanted to know if I wanted to work on a design with him. So my brain started going and I started googling what’s out here in this D&D fantasy market. Turns out most of it is kinda Facebook algorithm-generated garbage, just super poorly designed and made. The coolest shirts that were available featured scans of old books and modules but nothing original. So I thought man, we should really go hard on this and blow it up. I developed a 50 page deck and reviewed it with Joe in an effort to help visualize what a brand like Death Saves could look like. Geek.com: Yeah, it’s very noticeable. There’s a lot of palpable intent behind a lot of the designs, from placement of type and logos to easter eggs.DH: Yeah, totally. I don’t wanna phone in designs or just commission a piece of art. There has to be a little more going on there. I love design and I want to take all of my inspirations and filter it into Death Saves so it looks thoughtful and appealing to people who are into graphic design. I think it helps separate us from anything that might be similar. We apply different perspectives to what we do.Geek.com: A definite highlight from the first year of Death Saves has been the Frazetta collab. How did you guys go about making that happen?DH: Joe and I are huge Frazetta fans from way back when we were adolescents. We follow Frazetta Girls on social media and I think Joe and her chatted online a bit. Joe had the idea early on that it would be pretty cool to do something with them, so then we had to brainstorm and find a unique way to represent Frazetta’s artwork on merch. You can’t really modify his art – we wanted to something cool that wasn’t just putting his painting on a shirt. I had this idea based on an old ‘70s paperback to put this little text block, almost like a card in a museum underneath a painting, and that was one of the elements we brought in and applied across the collection. From there it was cutting out images or background, just whichever we wanted to focus on – like, the werewolf one is from the first issue of CREEPY #1 so we wrote “Death Saves” in the CREEPY font so it’s like we’re representing the original use of that image from that story.Geek.com: Because of how successful the collaboration has been can we expect further collaborations with other brands, artists, whatever, in the future?DH: Definitely. We have a lot of irons in the fire right now that I can’t talk about at length but yeah, there’s definitely more on the horizon. We would work with anyone whose work that we like. There’s this company called ARDUIN – back in the ‘80s they made a lot of supplements you could use with D&D and other gaming systems. Their aesthetic is really raw, old school stuff and I really want to do something with them, but the guy who ran it passed away. I’ve been trying to get in touch with them via letters in the mail because it looks like that’s the only way to contact them, but yeah, I’d love to do a collection of their stuff. It looks like a bunch of old never-before-seen D&D illustrations.Geek.com: It sounds like it’s already totally up your alley.DH: Yeah, it’s like how I run our Instagram. I love referencing and finding all of these obscure, weird things that I maybe haven’t even heard of. I love digging up those references.Geek.com: The Death Saves Instagram is actually pretty interesting, now that you mention it. Aside from talking about merch drops and sales, it almost seems to function more as a mood board.DH: Oh yeah, a hundred percent. It’s a mood board. I follow different streetwear companies who will post like, an image that references something they’re into but that’s it. Half the time it’s posted without explanation. I kinda wanted to do that but in a way that wasn’t just like hey, check out the cover of Player’s Handbook. So we were just like hey, let’s have everything say “Death Saves.” And on one hand I can flex my semi-mediocre photoshop skills but on the other, we’re referencing it in a way that’s clever and funny. I thought it’d be a more interesting way to post our inspirations and things we think are cool. Plus it gives me the opportunity to keep digging through references and uncovering things, discovering thinks I didn’t even know about. Stay on target Wesley Snipes Says ‘It’s All Good’ With Marvel Studios’ ‘Blade’ Reboot FilmHideo Kojima Rejects Battle Royale Games at SDCC Geek.com: The streetwear angle this brand has taken has always been super interesting. What aspects of streetwear and sneaker culture did you guys make an effort to bring into Death Saves?DH: Joe’s huge into streetwear and sneakers and I follow it pretty decently. What I noticed is that any time anyone tried to do something with a fantasy or heavy metal angle it always came off as pretty phoned-in and not particularly “designed.” It always felt like a wasted opportunity but regardless any time I saw it I was like, “I need to have that.” because it didn’t really exist. So when I work on designs for Death Saves I’m never just trying to make it look like a metal band tee shirt. I’m thinking about placement of graphics and unique type, the things that I really value in streetwear. Graphic design perspectives aren’t always really applied to metal tee shirts or anything and that’s the kind of thing that I like in streetwear — the graphic design is always cool, the typography is always really cool.last_img read more

VIDEO Belichick dropped a funny ice breaker during preSuper Bowl handshake with

first_imgYou would think a pre-Super Bowl handshake with Bill Belichick would be cold and awkward, but the traditional pregame greeting between The Hoodie and Philly coach Doug Pederson was downright pleasant.  It even saw Belichick get off a funny line to break the ice.After exchanging greetings when the two met for the traditionally brief coach chat, Belichick opened up by saying, “I was trying to find a game where you were behind, I couldn’t find one.”Watch out Belichick’s got jokes.Bill isn’t so bad when he’s observed in his natural element. He even displays humanlike characteristics. Pederson is a dude’s dude.Bill Belichick gave Doug Pederson props before #SBLII. @Eagles #FlyEaglesFly pic.twitter.com/bzcPPmrPlJ— NFL Films (@NFLFilms) February 8, 2018last_img

Your Future iPhone Might Know How You Are Feeling

first_img 2 min read Everything you do online is tracked. But what if companies were to know not only what you look at online, but also how you feel about it?That’s the next generation of computer data analytics. And if a recent Apple acquisition is any indication, a future generation of your iPhone may be capable of just that.The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant has reportedly scooped up San Diego-based artificial intelligence startup Emotient, which analyzes facial expressions to determine a person’s emotions.The acquisition was confirmed to the Wall Street Journal, though terms of the deal were not.Related: Apple Is Quietly Creating a New Indoor Mapping SystemApple did not immediately respond to Entrepreneur’s request for comment.What’s the value in being able to register a user’s feelings? From a business perspective, knowing what your customers think about an advertisement, a product or a story allows a company to adjust that piece of content so that customers like it better. That, in theory, will drive consumers to spend more and companies to make more money.This isn’t the first artificial intelligence startup that Apple has scooped up recently. In October, the company bought VocalIQ, a U.K.-based startup that aims to make it possible for people to speak with their computer devices.Related: Apple’s Latest Experiment Means You May Never Have to Listen to Your Voicemails Again Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. January 8, 2016center_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now »last_img read more

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first_img Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Tools to spot, diagnose and treat cancer in women were among the products highlighted by Hologic Inc. during the 2010 RSNA show in Chicago.The Selenia Dimensions 3-D breast tomosynthesis system addresses the primary limitations of 2-D digital mammography â?? the superimposition of normal breast tissue. Launched in Europe in September 2008, the system delivers both conventional digital mammogram and a tomosynthesis exam – all under one compression. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an â??approvable letterâ? for the Selenia Dimensions system for breast tomosynthesis (3-D) imaging.With the acquisition of Sentinelle Medical Inc., Hologic added a suite of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tools to its portfolio. Products include the Sentinelle breast MRI coil and the Sentinelle Aegis breast imaging and interventional software. Hologic also offers alternatives to open surgical breast biopsy. The company offers the ATEC, Eviva and Celero breast biopsy devices, the Eviva upright biopsy system and ergonomically engineered MultiCare Platinum breast biopsy table. New at RSNA was a works-in-progress Abrivo breast biopsy device and Affirm breast biopsy guidance system. The Affirm stereotactic-guided biopsy device is specifically designed for the Selenia Dimensions system. Another highlight was a display of the Aixplorer Multiwave ultrasound system. Under the terms of a new agreement, Hologic will sell, install and service SuperSonic Imagineâ??s Aixplorer ultrasound technology platform to the breast care community in the United States.For more information: www.hologic.com Videos | March 22, 2011 Hologic – Breast Ultrasound, MRI and Tomosynthesis are Highlights Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting. center_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Women’s Health View all 62 items Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Throwback Thursday Roosevelts fishing trip to Isla del Coco

first_imgDid you know that U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Costa Rica’s Isla del Coco? Thanks to Larry Chastain we were able to get and digitize these photos about FDR’s visit to Costa Rica.We have limited information on these photos, including the date, but are looking into getting more information about the trip.Do you know anything about FDR’s fishing trip to Costa Rica? Related posts:Tico Times #TBT: The one millionth Tico Throwback Thursday: Bulls from 1981 Throwback Thursday: Pocho the crocodile funeral Throwback Thursday: Making cocktails with Cacique Thanks for reading The Tico Times. We strive to keep you up to date about everything that’s been happening in Costa Rica. We work hard to keep our reporting independent and groundbreaking, but we need your help. The Tico Times is partly funded by you and every little bit helps. If all our readers chipped in a buck a month we’d be set for years. Support the Tico Times Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Rwanda Calling 2015 targets the Indian outbound travel market

first_imgRwanda Calling 2015, an initiative of the Rwanda Development Board (RDB), aimed at enhancing trade, tourism and investments into the country, held its International Business Forum recently at the Lemigo Hotel, Kigali.Guldeep Singh Sahni, President, Outbound Tour Operators Association of India (OTOAI) led the 15 member delegation, which consisted of businessmen and investors from diverse sectors such as tourism, education, healthcare, manufacturing, trading as well as communications and information technology.The highlight of the Conference was the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Rwanda Tours and Travel Association (RTTA) and OTOAI. Sahni, signed on behalf of OTOAI, while Joseph Birori, Chairman, signed on behalf of RTTA.Birori remarked, “This MoU will help in marketing Rwanda as a must -visit tourist destination in India, which we expect to significantly increase number of tourists from the country.”Birori was of the opinion that the agreement will enable Rwanda to tap the huge Indian market and help improve the sector’s foreign exchange earnings.Sahni added, “Rwanda is an attractive country with its natural resources. Our members will work with you to encourage more Indians to visit Rwanda.”Faustin Karasira, Head, Tourism Department, RDB said, “We want to penetrate the Indian market, especially by targeting business tourists. Besides, when more Indians visit the country, they will recommend Rwanda to their friends and business partners, which will help us to tap investors for the tourism and hospitality industries.”Clarence Fernandes, the Mumbai based Representative of RDB said, “We are indeed delighted to bring in the first ever familiarisation tour from India, which consists of top producing outbound tour operators, including Kuoni, Thomas Cook, Kesari Tours, Urvi Tours, Akbar Travels, Harshil Travels, Weldon Travels and High Flyers.”“Actually showcasing a MICE event, Rwanda Calling 2015, to these MICE planners, alongside with the various attractions that Rwanda has to offer, has given our travel and tour partners a firsthand experience of the destination and we do believe that it is now only a matter of time, before we shall be able to see tangible results of this FAM tour organised in collaboration with Kenya Airways – the Pride of Africa.”last_img read more

Freddie Mac Posts Net Loss of 475 Million in Q3

first_img Department of Treasury Freddie Mac Net Loss Q3 2015 Earnings Statement 2015-11-03 Seth Welborn in Daily Dose, Data, Government, Headlines, News Freddie Mac Posts Net Loss of $475 Million in Q3 Sharecenter_img Freddie Mac reported a net loss of $475 million for Q3 2015 in its 10-Q filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday, the first time the GSE has reported a quarterly net loss in four years. The good news is that Freddie Mac will not need another draw from the Department of Treasury to continue operations.In the second quarter of 2015, Freddie Mac reported a net income of $4.2 billion. The Enterprise also reported a comprehensive loss in Q3 of $501 million, compared to a comprehensive income of $3.9 billion in the previous quarter. According to Freddie Mac CEO Donald Layton, the dropoff of $4.675 billion in net income from Q2 to Q3 is largely due to changes in interest rates that drove down the value of its derivatives (securities with a price derived from underlying assets—a contract between parties based on the assets, with the value of the contract determined by fluctuations in the underlying assets).“For the first time in four years, Freddie Mac had a net loss in the most recent quarter,” Layton said. “This $0.5 billion loss was caused mainly by the accounting associated with our use of derivatives, whereby the derivatives are marked-to-market but many of the assets and liabilities being hedged are not. The resulting difference between GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles) reporting and the actual underlying economics, which has created significant GAAP income volatility in our quarterly financial statements, reduced the after-tax earnings in the quarter by an estimated $1.5 billion as interest rates declined significantly. In the prior quarter, we had the opposite result with a $1.5 billion positive contribution to earnings as rates rose significantly.”The loss will not cause Freddie Mac to need another draw from Treasury since it was only a fraction of the $1.8 billion net worth reserve the Enterprise has under the Preferred Stock Agreement, according to Layton. The dividends paid into Treasury by Freddie Mac remained unchanged at $96.5 billion, which is about $25 billion more than the $71 billion the Enterprise received in a taxpayer-funded bailout in 2008.Click here to see Freddie Mac’s complete Q3 earnings report.Dallas-based servicer Nationstar Mortgage Holdings on Tuesday reported adjusted earnings of $32 million and a quarterly net loss (for GAAP purposes) of $66 million. Nationstar reported a quarterly net income of $75 million in Q2, which followed a quarterly net loss of $48 million in Q1.The company’s servicing segment achieved an adjusted pretax income of $36 million in Q3, which computes to 3.6 basis points of profitability based on average servicing during the quarter. For Nationstar’s originations segment, revenues increased sequentially during Q3 for the fifth straight quarter, up to $180 million.During Q3, Xome sold more than 4,900 properties and ended the quarter with about 8,000 in its inventory, increasing third-party revenues to 34 percent of total revenue as Xome continues to diversify its revenue streams and client base, according to Nationstar.”Our servicing segment delivered on our profitability goal by improving delinquency levels which resulted in higher base servicing fees and continued to focus on driving down expenses that have the most impact to our profitability,” said Jay Bray, CEO of Nationstar. “Our originations team also met its primary goal to replenish our servicing portfolio in a cost effective manner by funding $5 billion in mortgages, the highest volume since the fourth quarter of 2013. Furthermore, Xome continues to simplify real estate transactions by enabling buyers, sellers, and real estate professionals to successfully operate in the most efficient, transparent manner possible.”Click here to see Nationstar’s Q3 earnings statement. November 3, 2015 572 Views last_img read more