How England made Junior World Cup final

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS French wing Marvin O’Connor scored his side’s second try of the game with 52 minutes on the clock, making some space for himself along the touchline before cutting inside Ransom to touch down. The conversion was missed, giving France a five-point lead at 18-13.England hit back with their third try just five minutes later. Ransom, who came within meters of scoring in the first half, made no mistake second time around, touching down wide of the posts after some strong phase play from his teammates. Ford’s successful conversion gave England back the lead at 20-18.A Ford penalty after 65 minutes opened England’s lead up to five points, but France almost scored their third try ten minutes later in bizarre circumstance. A French line-out was won by England, but another ball appeared on the pitch while England had possession and the line-out was taken again. France won at the second attempt and almost scored in the corner, but the TV Match Official ruled that the ball wasn’t touched down.Ford’s radar was again spot on with seven minutes left to play, converting a long range penalty to give England an eight point lead at 26-18. France then went over England’s try line, but Irish referee John Lacey pulled it back after spotting a forward pass in the build up.With the clock past 80, France were throwing everything at England, but a loose pass in their own half was snapped up by captain Gray who ran through unopposed to touch down between the posts and Ford’s conversion brought the game to a close.Points: Wade 1T, Ford 1T, Ransom 1T, Gray 1T; Ford 3P 2C. TREVISO, ITALY – JUNE 22: George Ford of England charges upfield during the IRB Junior World Championship match between England and France at the Stadio Communale di Monigo on June 22, 2011 in Treviso, Italy. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) England U20 starting XV v France:15 Ben Ransom (Saracens)14 Jonathan Joseph (London Irish)13 Guy Armitage (London Irish)12 Owen Farrell (Saracens)11 Christian Wade (London Wasps)10 George Ford (Leicester Tigers)9 Chris Cook (Bath Rugby)1 Mako Vunipola Saracens2 Mikey Haywood (Northampton Saints)3 Will Collier (Harlequins)4 Joe Launchbury (London Wasps)5 Charlie Matthews (Harlequins)6 Matt Kvesic (Worcester Warriors)7 Matt Everard (Leicester Tigers)8 Alex Gray (C) (Newcastle Falcons)Replacements:16 Rob Buchanan (Harlequins) on for Mikey Haywood 53 mins17 Ryan Bower (Leicester Tigers) on for Will Collier 77 mins18 Sam Twomey (Harlequins) on for Joe Launchbury 77 mins19 Sam Jones (London Wasps) on for Matt Kvesic 57 mins20 Dan Robson (Gloucester Rugby) on for Chris Cook 65 mins21 Ryan Mills (Gloucester Rugby) on for Owen Farrell 50 mins22 Marland Yarde (London Irish) on for Guy Armitage 56 mins George Ford on his way to scoring a tryEngland U20 33-18 France U20England U20 are through to the final of the IRB Junior World Championship for the third time in four years after beating northern hemisphere rivals France 33-18 in Treviso, Italy. They will play the winners of the second semi-final between Australia and New Zealand.Tries from London Wasps wing Christian Wade, Leicester Tigers fly half George Ford, Saracens full back Ben Ransom and Newcastle Falcons No. 8 and captain Alex Gray helped England to the win in what was a topsy-turvy encounter, played in hot conditions.England started with real intensity and a strong scrum in the middle of the park was rewarded with a penalty that was kicked into touch by Ford. Northampton Saints hooker Mikey Haywood delivered a good throw from the line out and the ball was worked back to Farrell who kicked a grubber through for Wade to touch down for his fifth try of the competition. Ford missed the conversion.France’s response was immediate, heavy pressure from the restart resulted in USA Perpignan prop Sebastian Taofifenua burrowing over to score, and the successful conversion from Jean Pascal Barraque gave France the lead at 7-5.Both sides then exchanged penalties, Barraque for France and Ford for England, to make the score 10-8. Ford then missed a three-pointer that would have reclaimed the lead for Head Coach Rob Hunter’s men, dragging his kick just wide.Ford’s nifty footwork freed up space in open play minutes later, but the 18-year-old fly half couldn’t find the support to back him up. England were applying heavy pressure on the French defence and almost broke through five minutes before the break. Ransom found some space behind the French line but was denied by an excellent last-ditch cover tackle.England’s second try came just before half time, again, sustained pressure from the English pack resulted in Ford displaying some deft footwork to dodge several French tackles before crashing over to make the score 13-10 at the break, after the conversion was missed.Sloppy play from England at the start of the second half handed France two early penalties, No. 13 Barraque missed the first but made no mistake with the second to tie the scores up at 13-apiece.last_img read more

Wasps team filled with young talent for Bath trip

first_imgGLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 26: Christian Wade of London Wasps in action during the Aviva Premiership match between Gloucester and London Wasps at Kingsholm Stadium on December 26, 2011 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by Matthew Lewis/Getty Images) Young said: “It’s obviously a massive game tomorrow and the boys are well aware of what’s at stake. We’ve got to be much more accurate than we have been and get off to a strong start. We’re up against a side full of quality so we’re in no doubt as to the challenge that we’re going to face.”Starting XV:15. Jack Wallace*14. Christian Wade*13. Elliot Daly*12. Dominic Waldouck11. Tom Varndell10. Nick Robinson9. Charlie Davies*1. Tim Payne2. Tom Lindsay3. Ben Broster4. Joe Launchbury*5. Richard Birkett (C)6. Sam Jones*7. Jonathan Poff8. Billy Vunipola* The young ones: Christian WadeLondon Wasps head to Bath this weekend seeking a vital away Aviva Premiership win.Wasps are looking to do the double over their West Country counterparts having beaten Bath 27-24 earlier this season in an exciting game at Adams Park.Director of Rugby Dai Young has made three changes to his starting line-up, which includes seven players aged 21 or under.In the only change in the backs, Ryan Davis misses the chance to face his old side having been injured in last weekend’s game, but the fit-again centre Dom Waldouck comes straight back in to wear the number 12 shirt.In the pack Young has moved young Joe Launchbury from back-row to second-row with Billy Vunipola earning the number 8 shirt and Sam Jones shifting to number six. Richard Birkett captains the side once again. On the bench Nic Berry returns to provide scrum-half cover and Tinus Du Plessis is also named. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Replacements16. Vladislav Korshunov17. Zac Taulafo18. Simon McIntyre19. Ross Filipo20. Tinus DuPlessis21. Nic Berry22. Chris Mayor23. Lee Robinson*Players aged 21 or under TAGS: Bath RugbyWasps last_img read more

Six Nations: England v Wales tunnelcam

first_imghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16xxoo0TpYM LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also featured in a cameo are Manchester United superstars Ryan Giggs, Michael Carrick and Rio Ferdinandcenter_img Can he kick it?: England scrum-half Danny Care launches a box-kick against Wales in their 29-18 winEver wondered what goes on before, during and after a big game within the England camp? Well, here’s a little insight from Sunday’s England v Wales game from an English perspective.last_img

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgAs the end of the season approaches the stakes grow higher for the teams competing in the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12, so the match-winning heroes are all the more celebrated while the villains are for the high-jump. Back-handed complimentSaracens wing Dave Strettle is among the Saints this week for his astonishing, back-handed offload which created a try for Chris Wyles. Saracens were trailing 10-7 to Exeter Chiefs after 20 minutes when a big hit by Maro Itoje forced the ball loose and his second-row partner George Kruis snaffled it. Saracens set off out of their own half with Alex Goode and Wyles making ground then passing to Strettle, who went haring up the left. When Ian Whitten came flying across to make the cover tackle, Strettle off-loaded magnificently out of contact and out of the back of his hand to find Wyles and the centre sprinted in for the try. Tanks mate: Luke Cowan-Dickie (left) hugs “Tank” Waldrom. (Photo: Action Images)Top TankThomas Waldrom helped Exeter Chiefs to one of the most crucial wins in their history by scoring two tries against Saracens. Both were from close range after a series of drives by the pack but the second one was particularly clever as Waldrom touched down at the base of the post – the one place it was totally impossible to defend with the mass of bodies on the line.Exeter’s 24-20 win put them in the top four and keeps alive the Chiefs’ hopes of reaching the Premiership play-offs for the first time.For Waldrom, the tries were his 15th and 16th touchdowns of the season, putting him four ahead of the next most prolific players from this Premiership campaign, Tom Arscott and Christian Wade, and just one behind the all-time record for a forward in a Premiership season, which was set many moons ago by Dominic Chapman of Richmond. The SaintsHometown heroesHats off to two of the Aviva Premiership’s greatest one-club men, Mark Cueto and Ugo Monye, who both played their last home matches for their teams before their impending retirements – and signed off in style.Monye made his Premiership debut for Harlequins in the 2002-03 season and after 12 campaigns in the top flight (and one in the Championship) now has 166 Premiership appearances and 52 tries to his name.He scored two of those tries on Friday night in a Man of the Match performance in defeat against Bath and in so doing, became Quins’ all-time top Premiership try-scorer.Cueto will finish his 14-season career at Sale next week as the entire Premiership’s leading try-scorer after he notched up try number 90 in the 34-28 win over Newcastle. That particular touchdown owed everything to the generosity of Sale’s other wing, Tom Brady, who passed outside to Cueto, when he had a clear run to the line himself. However after 218 Premiership appearances for the club, you have to say Cueto deserves everything he gets. Top man: Josh Matavesi with his Man of the Match award after the Ospreys’ win. (Photo: Inpho)Ospreys flyingJosh Matavesi was the Man of the Match as the Ospreys beat Glasgow Warriors 21-10 to go into the last week of the regular season in the Guinness Pro12 on top of the table and on a five-game winning streak.The centre had an outstanding game in defence as much as in attack, but some of his limelight was stolen by Ospreys scrum-half Rhys Webb who scored a fine individual try.The Ospreys were 11-3 up after 58 minutes when a lineout move from the training ground sent Webb through a gap and down the right flank, then he chipped deftly over Glasgow wing Niko Matawalu, re-gathered the ball and touched down for his 17th try of the season, which Dan Biggar converted for an 18-3 lead.The Ospreys are still not assured of a home semi-final in the Pro12 as just one point separates the top four clubs but they are in the best position going into the final round next Saturday. Tiger show their teethLeicester’s team deserve a pat on the back for the way they dug in after Seremaia Bai was sent off in the first half, and battled to a 26-21 victory at Wasps – a win which takes them up into third spot and raises their hopes of avoiding becoming the first Tigers side in ten years to fail to reach the Premiership play-offs.Niall Morris, Niki Goneva and Adam Thompstone scored Leicester’s three tries but it was an all-round team effort which earned the precious four points. Ouch: Matt Kvesic sends Tomas O’Leary plunging to the ground. (Photo: Getty Images)The SinnersForwards marchedTwo Aviva Premiership forwards received their marching orders in this weekend’s matches, plus one from the Guinness Pro12, as Leicester’s Seremaia Bai, Gloucester’s Matt Kvesic and Ulster’s Iain Henderson were all shown red cards for illegal and potentially dangerous play.Bai flew into a ruck off his feet late in the first half and clattered head first into the exposed head of Wasps’ No 8 Nathan Hughes. At first referee Wayne Barnes showed Bai a yellow card but upgraded it to red after looking at the replays.Henderson’s offence was similar, although his forearm seemed to make contact with Ronan O’Mahony’s head just before his own head followed in, but referee Nigel Owens sent him for an early bath.Kvesic was sent off for a tip tackle on Tomas O’Leary in the 23rd minute of Gloucester’s clash with London Irish. The openside picked up the scrum-half – who didn’t even have the ball – and dumped him on the back of his neck, causing an injury which ended O’Leary’s participation in the game. Kvesic will be the third Gloucester player to be up before the beak in two weeks, after Bill Meakes and Ross Moriarty both got two-week bans last week. Closing in: Matt Jess (right) gets ready to tackle Ashton. (Photo: Action Images)Great saveExeter wing Matt Jess also played a key role in their win, but in defence rather than attack. In the dying seconds of the match, Saracens attacked from their own half, seeking a winning try. Dave Strettle was brought down by Henry Slade but Neil de Kock still got the ball to Chris Ashton, who was steaming into the 22 on a diagonal run. The former England wing looked set to score, but Jess chased back and just grabbed his left ankle, bringing him down and saving the day for Exeter. Mr Cool: Paddy Jackson kicks the vital conversion, but what is Paul O’Connell shouting? (Photo: Inpho)Paddy powerAnother kicking hero was being anointed over in Ulster as Paddy Jackson landed a conversion from the touchline with the last kick of the game to give Ulster a 23-23 draw with Munster and enable them to stay in the hunt for a home semi-final in the Guinness Pro12.Jackson’s long pass helped create the decisive try for Paul Marshall, as Ulster trailed 23-16 with the 80 minutes up, and the fly-half then put the conversion on target from wide on the left. As no away team has ever won a Pro12 semi, it could be a priceless kick from the excellent Ulsterman. Far from coolOne Harlequins staff member should be thanking their lucky stars Marland Yarde came out of Saturday’s match in one piece as their concern for their own safety meant they failed to stop the wing taking a major tumble. The man was sitting on an ice box close to the tunnel – presumably ready to take drinks on – and, when he saw Yarde back-pedalling towards him trying to catch a high ball, he decided to remove himself from the danger zone, but didn’t attempt to take the ice-box with him. Poor Yarde clattered into it and fell over backwards. TAGS: Leicester TigersOspreys Champion qualityWell done to Bristol and Worcester Warriors, who both negotiated somewhat nervy Greene King IPA Championship play-off semi-finals and will play one another in the two-legged final on 20 and 27 May. Whichever of the two wins the single promotion spot to the Aviva Premiership, they will certainly be better prepared than poor London Welsh were after their surprise play-off victory last year. Bristol and Worcester both have players of international quality in their squads and should cope much better with the step up.Final countdown: Bristol boss Andy Robinson celebrates with Olly Robinson. (Photo: Getty Images) Ford focusedGeorge Ford secured a crucial win for Bath at Harlequins with a 75th minute penalty which took the visitors from 26-24 down to 27-26 up and enabled them to make certain of a Premiership semi-final spot – and a home one, at that – for the first time in five years.The lead had already changed hands half a dozen times in a ding-dong battle and the final penalty had to be taken from 15 metres in from the left, not far inside the 10m line, but Ford landed the tricky kick as coolly as you like and sent the travelling fans into raptures. Flying highCongratulations to the RAF rugby team who became the Inter-Services Champions for the first time since 1994, thanks to the Army’s 36-18 win over the Navy in the Babcock Trophy match at Twickenham on Saturday.The RAF had already beaten the Army 33-29 at Aldershot last month and drawn 32-32 with the Navy, so their squad were on hand to watch the last of the matches at Twickenham and collected the coveted Inter-Services Cup at the end. Better together: Mark Cueto (left) crosses the line with Tom Brady. (Photo: Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Not a top-knotHe may be a ridiculously talented, superbly athletic 18-year-old, who has scored 18 tries for the New Zealand Sevens team in this season’s HSBC Sevens World Series, but even Rieko Ioane can’t get away with this top-knot. Make an appointment at the Salon of Shame, Rieko.Hair-raising: Rieko Ioane (left) and his top-knot at the Glasgow Sevens. (Photo: Getty Images)last_img read more

Ireland’s 2015 Rugby World Cup squad

first_imgPaul O’Connell will captain the 2015 Ireland World Cup squad in his last appearance in a Test tournament. The side is heavily weighted in experience with nine players over 50 caps: O’Connell alone has 103. By Taylor Heyman The squad has 14 players with World Cup experience and many of those without were involved with Ireland’s Six Nations victories in 2014 and 15.Over half the squad named today – six backs and ten forwards – are currently playing together at provincial level at Leinster.  The others are from a spread of Ireland’s top provincial clubs.ForwardsJoe Schmidt has taken a gamble on loosehead prop Cian Healy making a return to full match fitness following neck surgery.Mike Ross and Jack McGrath match experience with the younger Nathan White’s two caps and the selection of one-cap Tadhg Furlong to complete the prop offering. This has left Mike Bent, who plays both tighthead and loosehead, excluded.The Irish hookers are Rory Best, Sean Cronin and Richardt Strauss, who have a total of 138 caps between them.International experience: veteran Rory Best is one of three solid choices for Ireland at hookerIain Henderson, Captain Paul O’Connell, Donnacha Ryan and Devin Toner will fill the second-row slots.A formidable Irish back row will feature Jamie Heaslip, Chris Henry, Jordi Murphy, Sean O’Brien and Peter O’Mahony.BacksThe Irish backs selection is characterised by utility players.Keith Earls and Luke Fitzgerald can cover anywhere in the back three as well as the centres and Madigan could cover the missing third scrum-half position.Conor Murray and Eoin Reddan are the two scrum-halves named, the absence of Isaac Boss making room for an extra centre.Paddy Jackson, Ian Madigan and Johnny Sexton are the chosen fly-halves for the tournament. Sexton is expected to be the starting choice. Darren Cave, Robbie Henshaw and Jared Payne will make up the centres. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS One last time: Paul O’Connell will lead Ireland for the World Cup before retiring from Test rugby center_img Specialist: Darren Cave will bring expertise to the Irish centresThe winners of the stiff competition for positions in the back three are Tommy Bowe, Keith Earls, Luke Fitzgerald, Dave Kearney, Rob Kearney and Simon Zebo.The biggest shock omission was winger Andrew Trimble, who only played 30 minutes of the warm-up game against Wales on 8 August before a recurrence of the toe injury which kept him out of the 2015 Six Nations.Shock omission: winger Andrew Trimble has been left out of Schmidt’s squadFelix Jones was left out of the 31-man squad after uninspiring performances in the warm-up games. Fergus McFadden and Craig Gilroy also failed to make the cut.Ireland’s 31-man squadProps: Tadhg Furlong (Clontarf/Leinster, 1 cap), Cian Healy (Clontarf/Leinster, 51 caps), Jack McGrath (St. Mary’s College/Leinster, 19 caps), Mike Ross (Clontarf/Leinster, 51 caps), Nathan White (Connacht, 2 caps)Hookers: Rory Best (Banbridge/Ulster, 84 caps), Sean Cronin (St. Mary’s College/Leinster, 45 caps), Richardt Strauss (Old Wesley/Leinster, 9 caps)Second row: Iain Henderson (Ulster, 19 caps), Paul O’Connell (Captain, Young Munster, 103 caps), Donnacha Ryan (Shannon/Munster, 30 caps), Devin Toner (Lansdowne/Leinster, 26 caps)Back Row: Jamie Heaslip (Dublin University/Leinster, 74 caps), Chris Henry (Malone/Ulster, 18 caps), Jordi Murphy (Lansdowne/Leinster, 12 caps), Sean O’Brien (UCD/Leinster, 36 caps),Peter O’Mahony (Cork Constitution/Munster, 31 caps)Scrum-halves: Conor Murray (Garryowen/Munster, 36 caps), Eoin Reddan (Old Crescent/Leinster, 63 caps)Fly-halves: Paddy Jackson (Dungannon/Ulster, 12 caps), Ian Madigan (Blackrock College/Leinster, 20 caps), Jonathan Sexton (St. Mary’s College/Leinster, 52 caps) Centres: Darren Cave (Belfast Harlequins/Ulster, 9 caps), Luke Fitzgerald (Blackrock College/Leinster, 30 caps), Robbie Henshaw (Buccaneers/Connacht, 11 caps), Jared Payne (Ulster, 7 caps)Back three: Tommy Bowe (Belfast Harlequins/Ulster, 62 caps), Keith Earls (Young Munster/Munster, 41 caps), Dave Kearney (Lansdowne/Leinster, 9 caps), Rob Kearney (UCD/Leinster, 63 caps), Simon Zebo (Cork Constitution/Munster, 17 caps)last_img read more

Lions name team to take on the Chiefs

first_img TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Red alert: Tomas Francis, Kristian Dacey, Liam Williams, Gareth Davies and Cory Hill at the Maori game. Photo: Getty Images We run the rule over the squad picked for the Chiefs game on the 2017 British & Irish Lions tour All six of the players called up to the British & Irish Lions squad over the weekend are included on the bench in the team to play the Chiefs on Tuesday. Kristian Dacey, Allan Dell and Tomas Francis will provide front-row cover, with Cory Hill, Gareth Davies and Finn Russell also amongst the replacements.Rory Best will captain the Lions in this midweek fixture and is joined in the front row by England props Joe Marler and Dan Cole, which suggests Kyle Sinckler has earned a bench spot behind expected starting tighthead Tadhg Furlong for the first Test against the All Blacks.Leader: Rory Best is the second hooker to captain on the 2017 tour after Ken Owens. Photo: Getty ImagesIain Henderson, who was so impressive against the Highlanders and made an impact as a replacement in the win over the Maori, teams up with Courtney Lawes in the second row.The lock pairing and the appearance of Alun Wyn Jones on the bench points to the Saracens combination of George Kruis and Maro Itoje – both hugely impressive in Saturday’s victory – starting the first Test.James Haskell, Justin Tipuric and CJ Stander form the back row. Those left out are Peter O’Mahony, Sean O’Brien and Taulupe Faletau, who have worked so well together in the two Saturday wins over the Crusaders and Maori, as well as tour captain Sam Warburton.The coaches and Warburton himself have been raising the possibility of him not starting the first Test for a long time so either he will be on the bench – or it’s all a ruse and he starts ahead of O’Mahony at six or O’Brien at seven.In at 15: Liam Williams gets a start in his preferred position of full-back. Photo: Getty ImagesLiam Williams makes his first start of the tour at full-back and will surely be relishing the chance to show what he can do from 15 having not been at his best in his two games on the wing to date.English pair Jack Nowell and Elliot Daly are on the wings – will one of them make the bench on Saturday? – while in midfield it’s the Irish pairing of Jared Payne and Robbie Henshaw.The half-backs are Dan Biggar and Greig Laidlaw, who closed out the win over the Maori at nine and ten. We know Conor Murray and Rhys Webb will be the two scrum-halves involved in the first Test, and who starts at fly-half is likely to come down to whether Owen Farrell is fit.Key man: Stephen Donald, centre, takes part in Chiefs training. Photo: Getty ImagesStephen Donald, the former Bath fly-half who kicked the winning penalty in the 2011 World Cup final, will captain the Chiefs against the Lions. Two of the Maori team that lost to the Lions in Rotorua on Saturday – Liam Messam and Hika Elliot – are included on the bench while Tim Nanai-Williams, who caused his cousin Sonny Bill Williams a few issues on Friday night during Samoa’s defeat by the All Blacks, starts at outside-centre.Last year the Chiefs humbled Wales 40-7 in a midweek fixture so Gatland will be well aware of the challenge that awaits against his former team.“We are five games into the tour and there is still a lot to play for,” said Gatland. “Those involved on Tuesday will be playing not only for themselves in terms of further selection but also for the whole squad.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE“We are here to win a Test series and we have brought cover for the replacements bench so we can limit the number of players who need to double up, which is tough to do at this level of rugby.“We know it is going to be another big challenge against the Chiefs who have won the Super Rugby title twice in the last five years.”Chiefs v British & Irish Lions, Tuesday 20 June, 7.35pm (8.35am UK & Ireland), FMG Stadium Waikato, live on Sky Sports and TalkSportChiefs: Shaun Stevenson; Toni Pulu, Tim Nanai-Williams, Johnny Fa’auli, Solomon Alaimalo; Stephen Donald (capt), Finlay Christie; Tom Sanders, Lachlan Boshier, Mitch Brown, Michael Allardice, Dominic Bird, Nepo Laulala, Liam Polwart, Siegfried Fisiihoi.Replacements: Hika Elliot, Aidan Ross, Atu Moli, Liam Messam, Mitch Karpik, Jonathan Taumateine, Luteru Laulala, Chase Tiatia. Lions: Liam Williams; Jack Nowell, Jared Payne, Robbie Henshaw, Elliot Daly; Dan Biggar, Greig Laidlaw; Joe Marler, Rory Best (capt), Dan Cole, Iain Henderson, Courtney Lawes, James Haskell, Justin Tipuric, CJ Stander.Replacements: Kristian Dacey, Allan Dell, Tomas Francis, Cory Hill, Alun Wyn Jones, Gareth Davies, Finn Russell, Tommy Seymour.last_img read more

Abundan los llamados a estudiar y cambiar la estructura de…

first_imgAbundan los llamados a estudiar y cambiar la estructura de la Iglesia Episcopal Los informes del Libro Azul de la Convención General de 2012 ofrece toda una gama de teorías y soluciones Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] A la 77ª. Reunión de la Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal se le pide que tamice y reduzca una variedad de respuestas a la cuestión de qué hacer respecto a la estructura de la Iglesia Episcopal que, al decir de un grupo, [la Iglesia] “ya no la necesita, ni puede costearla”.Por lo menos nueve de los comités, comisiones, agencias y juntas (CCAB por su sigla en inglés) de la Convención abordaron el tema en sus informes del Libro Azul. Los comentarios y soluciones propuestas van desde los más generales a los extremadamente específicos.Algunos, pero no todos, de esos nueve CCAB han suplementado sus comentarios con resoluciones (designadas con la letra “A”) destinadas a que la Convención las considere cuando sesione del 5 al 12 de julio en el Centro de Convenciones de Indiana, en Indianápolis, en la diócesis de este nombre en el estado de Indiana (las audiencias del comité legislativo y otras actividades de la Convención comienzan el 4 de julio).Los CCAB no son los únicos grupos que intervienen respecto a cómo la Iglesia Episcopal debe cambiar. Otros tres grupos también pueden presentar resoluciones a la Convención: los obispos (resoluciones B), las diócesis (resoluciones C) y los diputados (resoluciones D), y al menos 29 de las 110 diócesis de la Iglesia ya han presentado resoluciones acerca de la futura estructura de la Iglesia.Muchas de esas resoluciones diocesanas se basan en una resolución modelo que el obispo Stacy Sauls sugirió ante la Cámara de Obispos en septiembre pasado. Sauls, además de miembro de la Cámara, es también el jefe de operaciones de la Iglesia. (Una versión en vídeo de la presentación de Sauls acerca del cambio estructural, hecha mientras él se la exponía al personal del centro denominacional de la Iglesia, puede encontrarse aquí).La resolución modelo contendría un llamado de la Convención a que se creara una comisión especial nombrada por la obispa primada y por la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados para presentar ante una reunión especial de la Convención General -antes de que sesionara la Convención General [ordinaria] en 2015- “un plan para que la Iglesia reforme sus estructuras, su gobierno, su administración y su personal para facilitar la fiel participación de la Iglesia en la misión de Cristo…”Sauls le dijo al Consejo Ejecutivo en su reunión del 18 al 20 de abril que quiere hablar con el Consejo y con la Iglesia “acerca de poner todo sobre la mesa y reconstruir la Iglesia para una nueva época que no tiene ningún precedente histórico preciso”. Él añadió que quiere hablarle al Consejo “no acerca del pánico de nuestro declinante número [de fieles], sino de cómo fortalecer lo que funciona mejor, y reafirmar lo más firme, de manera que lo firme puede servir a lo que dista de estarlo”.La Rda. Gay Jennings, miembro del Consejo por la diócesis de Ohio, hizo notar en su sermón de clausura en esa misma reunión “las conversaciones sorprendentemente apasionadas acerca de la estructura, el gobierno, los papeles a desempeñar, las responsabilidades, las enmiendas canónicas y constitucionales, las normas parlamentarias, los CCAB, los presupuestos, el personal y la Convención General”.“Al hablar con personas de toda la Iglesia, éstas no tienen dudas de que hay necesidad de hacer algo nuevo, la gente se expresa con pasión, pero no se han presentado muchas sugerencias concretas, y algunos no están seguros de en qué consiste realmente la estructura de la Iglesia”, dijo ella. “La buena noticia es que a la gente le importa cómo estamos estructurados”.“La forma en que vamos a llevar a cabo la restructuración es tan importante como la forma en que estamos estructurados”, continuó Jennings. ¿Seremos fieles a nuestro Pacto Bautismal? ¿Seremos corajudos y valientes?”Otras denominaciones también enfrentan cuestiones de cambios estructuralesLos llamados a hacer un cambio estructural en la Iglesia Episcopal no son inusuales. Se producen en respuesta a los retos que enfrentan todas las principales denominaciones [protestantes], entre ellos la disminución del número de miembros y, por consiguiente, la reducción de sus economías, así como los cambios demográficos y culturales respecto al lugar y a la autoridad asignados a las comunidades religiosas en la sociedad.Las cuestiones de reforma estructural dominaron la discusión durante la reunión -del 16 al 20 de abril- de la Cámara de Obispos de la Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá, según el Anglican Journal. “Estamos hablando de una utilización más efectiva de nuestros recursos, tanto humanos como económicos, para hacer la obra que Dios nos llama a hacer”, dijo el arzobispo Fred Hiltz en una entrevista con Anglican Journal luego de la reunión.El Consejo General cuatrienal de la Iglesia Metodista Unida, que sesiona del 24 de abril al 4 de mayo en Tampa, Florida, se enfrenta con propuestas de restructuración complejas que consolidarían algunas agencias de la Iglesia y cambiarían su forma de gobierno. El Comité Legislativo de Administración General rehusó el 28 de abril los dos planes propuestos oficialmente: el Llamado a la Acción, y la Federación Metodista para la Acción Social.Los promotores de estos dos planes todavía pueden presentarlos al pleno para ser debatidos y sometidos a votación, según informa el United Methodist News Service. Y los partidarios del llamado Plan B alternativo aún podrían presentar una moción a la sesión plenaria para que su legislación reemplace a las otras. Los defensores de los diversos planes han estado discutiendo la posibilidad de llegar a avenimientos, según el UMNS.Entre tanto, una propuesta que surgió del plan del Llamado a la Acción para que el presidente del Consejo de Obispos desempeñe sus funciones a tiempo completo durante un período de cuatro años sin la responsabilidad de supervisar una zona geográfica no logró obtener la mayoría de dos tercios que necesitaba [para resultar aprobado]. Los delegados también rechazaron la propuesta de [llevar a cabo] un estudio de cuatro años sobre el tema. El fracaso tuvo lugar una semana después de que el Consejo de Obispos conviniera en reducir su estructura y en reunirse como tal sólo una vez al año.Cuando la Iglesia Presbiteriana EUA se reúna del 30 de junio al 7 de julio en Pittsburg, Pensilvania, para su 220ª. Asamblea General tomará en cuenta el informe de su Comité Especial sobre “La naturaleza de la Iglesia en el siglo XXI”. El comité fue convocado en la última Asamblea General (en 2010) para “ayudar a aumentar la comprensión de la Iglesia desde una perspectiva reformada y presbiteriana y ayudar a los miembros, actuales y nuevos, a formar planes firmes para nuestro futuro común”. El comité va a presentar 10 recomendaciones a la Asamblea General de este verano, que van desde el desarrollo del ministerio y otras cuestiones vocacionales a nuevas comunidades de inmigrantes y comunicaciones multilingües.La 10ª. Recomendación debate cómo los individuos presbiterianos y las organizaciones viven públicamente su fe. Llama en parte a la Iglesia a “centrar su ministerio y recursos en la sociedad en general y a movilizar sus agencias/entidades, consejos, congregaciones y miembros/discípulos para llegar a participar holísticamente con el Evangelio de Jesucristo en la justa paz de Dios y en la transformación sociopolítica”.La asamblea también oirá una serie de ocho recomendaciones de un comité al objeto de revisar el calendario de su asamblea bienal y la manera en que esas asambleas se llevan a cabo.En agosto de 2011, la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América discutió propuestas acerca del papel de la organización denominacional de la IELA en acompañar a las congregaciones y los sínodos, aumentar la capacidad del testimonio y el servicio evangélicos, fortalecer las relaciones interdependientes, promover la visión de Dios de una Iglesia multicultural y multiétnica, coordinar la misión mundial y la labor asistencial, y llevar por nuevos caminos la reflexión y la deliberación teológicas sobre la identidad y misión de la Iglesia.Las propuestas salieron del informe del equipo de trabajo “Viviendo en el Futuro” de la IELA, encargado de recomendar opciones para el futuro de la denominación. La asamblea también aprobó pasar del programa de una reunión bienal a un cono trienal a partir de 2016.Y la Iglesia Unida de Cristo, que también se reunió el verano pasado, aprobó lo que llamó revisiones del Gobierno Unificado a su constitución y estatutos. A las 38 conferencias de la IUC se les pidió que ratificaran las enmiendas constitucionales antes del próximo Sínodo General en 2013. Tales enmiendas deben ser aprobadas por dos tercios de las conferencias para entrar en vigor. Los cambios combinarán las cinco juntas de gobierno que ahora existen en una sola, la Junta de la Iglesia Unida de Cristo, compuesta de 52 miembros.La Asamblea General derrotó una propuesta de extender el ciclo de su reunión bienal a tres o cuatro años.Propuestas del Libro AzulSobre ese trasfondo, sigue a continuación un resumen de comentarios y resoluciones de los nueve CCAB de la Iglesia Episcopal, en el mismo orden en el que aparecen en el Libro Azul:♦ Los resultados del Comité de Estudio sobre Gobierno y Política de la Iglesia, de la Cámara de Diputados, nombrado en septiembre de 2009 por la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados Bonnie Anderson, estará disponible pronto. Al comité le encargaron que presentara a la Cámara de Diputados “un estudio de la historia, la teología, la estructura política y las realidades prácticas de la estructura gubernativa y política de nuestra Iglesia, y que explicara por qué creemos que es esencial facultar a cada orden del ministerio ‘para que ocupe su lugar en el gobierno de la Iglesia’”. A los miembros [del comité] también se les pidió que discutieran “qué tipo de teología se encarna en esa política; que fuerzas emanan de nuestro sistema de gobierno y qué retos presenta esto; y hacer recomendaciones basadas en sus resultados para fortalecer nuestra autodeterminación”.El comité decidió proporcionar a todos los diputados una colección de ensayos que abordan esos temas. La publicación también estará a disposición de otras personas. El Rdo. Tobias Haller BSG, presidente del comité, dijo a ENS que la publicación está al salir. Church Publishing Inc. está encargada de producir tanto la versión impresa como la electrónica (no Forward Movement, como dijo el comité en su informe del Libro Azul).El informe comienza en la página 57.♦ El extenso informe del Comité sobre el Estado de la Iglesia de la Cámara de Diputados advierte que la Iglesia Episcopal “al igual que todas las principales iglesias cristianas, es una denominación que esta experimentando una transición… Pero esta transición también se refleja en la comprensión de que la Iglesia ya no está en un mundo dominado por una estructura y una mentalidad ‘corporativa’…”El informe revisa extensamente los patrones de membresía y donaciones, y llega a la conclusión de que “el auge de la Iglesia Episcopal tuvo lugar durante los años 50 y 60, una época cuando la corporación empresarial surgió como el modelo dominante para toda clase de instituciones estadounidenses, incluidas las iglesias. Mirando al final de la gráfica en 2010, resulta claro que esta era ha pasado”. Los miembros dicen que quieren enfatizar en “la necesidad de la Iglesia de encontrar nuevos y diferentes modos de organizarse y de funcionar en pro de un ministerio en un medioambiente transformado” y resaltan que los “conceptos claves” que guían su pensamiento incluyen la misión, la estructura, la tecnología y la transparencia.En una encuesta realizada entre los diputados, el comité encontró, entre otras cosas, que para la mayoría de los diputados laicos y los suplentes, la restructuración del personal de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera [Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society] durante el trienio no tuvo ningún efecto perceptible en sus ministerios laicos. La restructuración tuvo lugar luego de que la Convención General aprobara un presupuesto que era $23 millones, cantidad más pequeño que el del trienio anterior.El comité no propuso resoluciones relacionadas con la restructuración de la Iglesia.El informe comienza en la página 59.♦ La Comisión Permanente sobre la Formación y Educación Cristianas de por Vida dice en su informe que “la educación en la historia, la estructura y el gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal es necesaria para los líderes” y propone la Resolución A041 (Enmienda del Canon I.17) para exigir que cada congregación imparta instrucción en la historia, estructura y forma de gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal, y dice que cualquier persona “al aceptar cualquier cargo” en la Iglesia tendrá que haber terminado esa instrucción, así como la instrucción “en los deberes y responsabilidades de su cargo”.El informe comienza en la página 151.♦ “¿Cómo desarrollamos los medios por los cuales las estructuras de la Iglesia se transformarán de manera tal que capaciten, faculten, equipen y apoyen el ministerio de todos los bautizados?”, pregunta en su informe la Comisión Permanente sobre Desarrollo del Ministerio. Un subcomité de la comisión recomienda que la Convención General llame a “toda la Iglesia a responder al contexto de un mundo cambiante, teniendo en cuenta los movimientos demográficos, los cambios biotécnicos y cómo el ministerio de todos los bautizados puede ser un paso hacia una nueva dirección”.El Desarrollo del Ministerio no propuso ninguna resolución que tenga que ver con un cambio estructural.El informe comienza en la página 475.♦ La Comisión Permanente sobre la Misión y la Evangelización de la Iglesia Episcopal fundamenta sus dos propuestas principales para un cambio estructural en su conclusión de que “el supuesto de una nación cristiana ya no existe. El supuesto de una mayoría blanca de clase media a alta ya no existe”.“Nuestras estructuras, políticas, estrategias y el Libro de Oración Común están concebidos en gran medida para contextos que bien ya no existen, o que simplemente ya no son dominantes”, dice la comisión -añadiendo, sin embargo, que “no hay razón para desechar todo lo que conocemos, hemos hecho y amamos. Hay una urgente necesidad de traducir, de crear espacios que sirvan como ‘laboratorios de la misión’ donde lo antiguo se encuentre con el futuro, donde las tradiciones encuentren sus márgenes”.Los miembros piden la creación de tal espacio para la innovación mediante “un acuerdo dentro de una diócesis de suspender ciertas prácticas convencionales en una ubicación estratégica, seguido por una reflexión sobre estructuras y cánones”.“Podemos luego revisar esos estatutos, una vez que resulte más claro qué estructuras facilitarían el ministerio en contextos que cambian con rapidez”, dicen.Por consiguiente, proponen la Resolución A073 (Establecer zonas diocesanas de empresa misionera) que haría que la Convención estableciera un Fondo para la Empresa Misionera de $1 millón para otorgar subvenciones de hasta $20.000 a cada diócesis para crear zonas de empresa misionera, “definidas como un área geográfica, como un grupo de congregaciones o como toda una diócesis comprometida con la misión y la evangelización que implique a grupos subrepresentados”.Hasta la próxima Convención, a las zonas se les concedería mayor libertad según lo autorizara el obispo en consulta con el liderazgo diocesano respecto a la designación de un estatus de “congregación”, la formación tradicional del liderazgo ordenado y el uso de textos autorizados para iniciar reuniones de culto.El fondo sería administrado por el Comité Permanente sobre Ministerio y Misión Locales del Consejo Ejecutivo.“Las estructuras son importantes y necesarias, pero deben ser lo bastante flexibles para que las comunidades episcopales fieles no se inhiban de la proclamación del evangelio, y tienen que ser reevaluadas como condiciones de la misión sobre el cambio de terreno”, dice la comisión en su explicación de la resolución. “Al crear estas estaciones para la empresa de la misión, y luego al estudiarlas, sabremos qué estructuras crear para reconocer y alentar el crecimiento de nuevas y re-desarrolladas comunidades de fe”.La comisión permanente reuniría los informes sobre los resultados de estos empeños, reflexionaría sobre los informes y “los usaría para cumplir la petición del Consejo Ejecutivo de ayudar a la Iglesia a ‘crear un proceso canónico para incorporar nuevos modelos de comunidad de fe en nuestras estructuras existentes’” para la 78ª. Convención General.La segunda propuesta de la comisión pide la reestructuración de la Convención General misma, de manera que “ofrezca preparación e inspiración para la misión y la evangelización mediante el deliberado adiestramiento del liderazgo, participando de los ‘mejores métodos’, de la narración, la interconexión y la dedicación a la misión en la ciudad sede, siendo las manos y los pies de Jesucristo: una comunidad en acción.La Resolución A075 (Reestructuración de la Convención General y del Gobierno de la Iglesia) establecería un equipo de trabajo de la Convención General sobre estructura y estrategia misional encargado de “presentar un plan a la Iglesia para reformar sus estructuras, gobierno, administración y personal a fin de facilitar la fiel dedicación de esta Iglesia a la misión de Cristo de una manera que maximice los recursos disponibles para esa misión en todos los niveles de esta Iglesia”.La resolución incluye en su llamado a “una seria consideración” de “más modelos de la Convención General centrados en la misión”, una sugerencia de “simplificar la estructura de gobierno de la Convención General” pasando a ser una legislatura unicameral.Los equipos de trabajo le informarían a la Iglesia no más tarde del 1 de febrero de 2015. La resolución pide $100.000 para [gastos de] implementación.El informe comienza en la página 497.♦ En febrero de 2011, el Consejo Ejecutivo le encargó a la Comisión Permanente sobre la Estructura de la Iglesia que coordinara las diversas conversaciones sobre planificación estratégica y posibles cambios estructurales. Durante dos días, en mayo de 2011, la comisión reunió a representantes de los comités permanentes conjuntos de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas y de Planificación y Disposiciones; la Comisión Permanente sobre Constitución y Cánones; el Equipo de Trabajo de Financiación Presupuestaria, el Comité de la Cámara de Diputados sobre el Estado de la Iglesia y los comités de Gobierno y Administración para la Misión, Finanzas para la Misión y Planificación Estratégica, así como a la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori, a la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados Bonnie Anderson, al Secretario de la Convención General y Director Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal Gregory Straub y al Tesorero Kurt Barnes.Después de la reunión, la comisión, según su informe en el Libro Azul, “reflexionó sobre lo que se oyó, sintetizó los temas y preocupaciones fundamentales”, le pidió al Consejo una reacción en junio de 2011 y luego elaboró una versión final de su informe sobre la reunión que incluye 11 resoluciones propuestas.La comisión dijo que no quería presentar “respuestas definitivas respecto a lo que podría parecer una estructura re-energizada”, sino “garantizar que se hagan las preguntas correctas de manera que todos los miembros de la Iglesia puedan vivir a la altura de sus ministerios bautismales en una estructura que premie la eficacia por encima de la eficiencia y que brinde la necesaria estabilidad para apoyar una atmósfera de flexibilidad y agilidad para el ministerio y la misión”.La Resolución A090 (Respaldar el principio de subsidiaridad) pide que la Convención y el Consejo Ejecutivo “adopten” la subsidiaridad que trabaja por “el adecuado equilibrio entre la unidad del todo y los papeles y responsabilidad de sus partes, en el que todos laboren hacia un sentido del bien de la totalidad y con el cual se midan”, y por el cual midan todas las operaciones presentes y futuras.La Resolución A091 (Reducir las contribuciones diocesanas) instruiría al Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F, por su sigla en inglés) a reducir el monto del dinero que la Convención les solicita a las diócesis para contribuir al funcionamiento denominacional “para dejar más dinero en los niveles diocesano, y por consiguiente parroquial y regional, a fin de apoyar un mayor estímulo de una innovación extensa y eficaz”. No se sugiere ninguna cantidad en la resolución.La Resolución A092 (Duración de la 78ª. Convención General) haría que la reunión de 2015 no durara menos de 10 días como una manera de evitar “la compresión del tiempo y la competencia por concentrar los testimonios” que “abrevia el debate en los comités y también contribuye a una atmósfera de impaciencia con el debate en el pleno y un deseo de limitar el número de oradores”.La Resolución A093 (Fondo para la duración de la 78ª. Convención General) pediría al PB&F que financiara adecuadamente una convención de 10 días y la Resolución A094 (Establecer un Fondo de Ayuda Económica para Diputados) haría que el PB&F estableciera un fondo para garantizar que al menos dos clérigos y dos diputados laicos de cada diócesis puedan asistir a esa reunión de la Convención. La explicación de la resolución advierte que existe un fondo semejante para que obispos de diócesis con limitados recursos puedan asistir a las reuniones de la Cámara de Obispos.La Resolución A095 (Frecuencia de las reuniones intermedias de la Cámara de Obispos) les pediría a los obispos que limitaran sus reuniones a una vez al año. Los obispos ahora se reúnen dos veces durante ciertos años del trienio.La Resolución A096 (Reducir las barreras para la participación en el liderazgo y gobierno de la Iglesia) pide a las diócesis y congregaciones encontrar “maneras creativas de reducir barreras de participación en el liderazgo y gobierno de la Iglesia”, añadiendo que esas barreras pueden incluir tiempo fuera del hogar o del empleo, o la necesidad de atender a miembros de la familia. Tales esfuerzos ayudarían a “reflejar la plena diversidad de la Iglesia”, dicen los miembros.La Resolución A097 (Fondo inicial para la reunión conjunta de comisiones, comités, agencias y juntas luego de la 78ª. Convención General) reservaría dinero en el presupuesto 2012-2015 que ha de ser aprobado en la reunión de la Convención General de este verano, para hacer posible una reunión en el otoño de 2015 para “orientación, preparación y desarrollo compartidos de planes de trabajo para el trienio 2016-2019”. De la misma manera, la Resolución A098 (Fondo inicial para la reunión conjunta de comisiones, comités, agencias y juntas luego de la 77ª. Convención General) habría incluido dinero en el presupuesto 2012-2015 para tal reunión a principios de 2013 para el trabajo de los CCAB en el trienio 2012-2015.La Resolución A099 (Fondo para una reunión de los CABB de mediados del trienio a través de la Internet) solicita $5.000 para una reunión de no más de dos representantes por cada CCAB, o para una o más de tales reuniones de representantes idóneos de los CCAB, de manera que los grupos con tareas compartidas o superpuestas “puedan aprender acerca de su trabajo y los unos de los otros”.La Resolución A100 (Coordinar la reforma y reestructuración de la Iglesia) pide que la comisión de estructura reciba y revise varias propuestas de reforma y reestructuración del gobierno [de la Iglesia] proveniente de toda la Iglesia, y cree un marco para conversaciones diocesanas y provinciales acerca de su misión y de cómo los cambios en las mayores estructuras de la Iglesia podrían mejorar esos empeños. La estructura reuniría los resultados de esas conversaciones en su informe a la 78ª. Convención General.En una duodécima resolución (Resolución A101, Convocar una consulta sobre eficacia diocesana) la comisión propone convocar una consulta sobre la “eficacia de las diócesis, con un énfasis en la posibilidad de re-alinear las diócesis para maximizar la eficacia de su testimonio y ministerio”.El informe comienza en la página 533.♦ Gran parte de la atención del Consejo Ejecutivo a los asuntos estructurales vino a través de los esfuerzos de coordinación que delegara en la comisión de estructura, y el Consejo propone proseguir esa delegación al menos en un área. La Resolución A122 (Supervisión financiera y proceso presupuestario) tendría una “revisión de la estructura, y recomienda revisiones de los Cánones y de las Normas Parlamentarias Conjuntas respecto a la supervisión económica y a los procesos presupuestarios de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera de la Iglesia Episcopal”.Los otros énfasis principales a los problemas estructurales provinieron del Comité sobre Planificación Estratégica del Consejo Ejecutivo. El informe de este último se incluye más abajo.El informe del Consejo Ejecutivo y de la mayoría de los comités que se le relacionan comienzan en la página 565.♦ Haciendo notar que “desde 1789 nuestra Iglesia ha cambiado regularmente su forma de organización”, los miembros del Equipo de Trabajo de Financiación Presupuestaria abogan en su informe por cambios en una estructura que, advierten, se remonta a la época que sigue a la segunda guerra mundial.Durante ese tiempo, dicen, “la Iglesia siguió al mundo empresarial estadounidense al adoptar una estructura que exigía una oficina central corporativa en una gran ciudad (cuanto mayor era la ciudad, tanto más importante la organización), con un personal de expertos que le brindara su saber a todos los que estaban por debajo de ellos”. Las diócesis y parroquias “se alineaban debajo de la estructura nacional de la mima manera en que las divisiones y departamentos eran divisiones subalternas de la moderna corporación estadounidense”.Ahora, dicen los miembros, los problemas organizacionales y económicos que la Iglesia enfrenta “salen de los cambios fundamentales en la cultura y los cambios profundos en la interpretación que el pueblo de la Iglesia tiene de su papel y lugar en la misma”. Por consiguiente, “la Iglesia ya no necesita, ni puede costear, la estructura de los últimos cincuenta años”, dicen ellos.Los miembros del Equipo de Trabajo de Financiación Presupuestaria, que fue creado en 2003 por la resolución B004 de la Convención General, proviene de cinco provincias, la Comisión Permanente sobre Mayordomía y Desarrollo, el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F) y el Comité sobre el Estado de la Iglesia de la Cámara de Diputados.Sauls, el jefe de operaciones de la Iglesia, fue miembro del equipo de trabajo durante el trienio. Él discutió con el equipo de trabajo lo que podría llamarse los prolegómenos de su presentación final sobre el cambio estructural y su modelo de resolución de la Convención. Hay menciones de su presentación en las actas de las reuniones del equipo de trabajo de junio y octubre de 2010 que aparecen publicadas aquí.Al hacer la exposición de su propuesta, los miembros del equipo de trabajo advirtieron que “si bien nuestras formas organizacionales son plenamente susceptibles de alterarse, resumirse, extenderse y cosas por el estilo, nuestra forma de gobierno no debe alterarse. En este siglo XXI seguimos atesorando el equilibrio de poderes, respetando todos los órdenes del ministerio en el proceso de la toma de decisiones, la abierta comunicación y consulta entre obispos, presbíteros, diáconos y el laicado que se remonta a la Convención General que fundó esta Iglesia en 1789”.A la luz de eso, proponen lo que llaman una “fundación para la reforma fundamental de nuestra estructura organizacional”, añadiendo que no se trata de “la única solución o de la solución perfecta”. La propuesta es semejante a la que el grupo presentó a la Convención General en 2009, vía la Resolución A183, para un ciclo presupuestario de nueve años. Esa resolución no llegó al pleno.La Resolución A150 (Crear una visión y un ciclo presupuestario de nueve años) haría que la Convención exigiera que a la reunión de 2015 se le presentara un plan para poner en práctica ese ciclo. La resolución prevé un ciclo presupuestario que coincida con el período [de gobierno] de cada obispo primado, y el trienio que precede a la elección de un obispo primado como un tiempo para “el desarrollo de una visión común… para el propósito de moldear la nominación y el proceso de elección [del obispo primado]”.Esa visión daría lugar a “objetivos del período” que se llevarían a cabo durante el período de gobierno de ese obispo [primado]. Las cámaras se reunirían conjuntamente al comienzo de la Convención General durante la cual ha de elegirse a un obispo primado para enmendar y ratificar los objetivos de ese período. Luego, se elaboraría un llamado “presupuesto del período” en base a esos objetivos.Habría un informe presupuestario anual para los líderes y miembros de la Iglesia, y la Convención recibiría una reseña del presupuesto y del progreso obtenido en el cumplimiento de esos objetivos, a través de reuniones conjuntas de ambas cámaras “para alentar la responsabilidad y, de este modo, que los objetivos puedan ser revisados cuando haga falta” La configuración del personal del centro denominacional respondería a esos objetivos, con algunos cargos coincidentes [en tiempo] con el período del obispo primado y otros de carácter permanente.El informe comienza en la página 717.♦ El Comité sobre Planificación Estratégica del Consejo Ejecutivo se creó en enero de 2009 para asistir al Consejo y al personal denominacional en la implementación de las prioridades de la Convención General. La labor del comité continuó en el trienio 2010-2012 a través del mandato contenido en la Resolución A061 aprobado por la última Convención.En el Plan Estratégico del comité para el Consejo Ejecutivo y la Convención General, los miembros dicen que el horizonte de planificación de 10 años que originalmente se concibió para el trabajo “ya no resulta práctico”. Dice que algún progreso se está haciendo en la planificación a largo plazo, añadiendo que hay “coordinación, información y responsabilidad limitadas”.El comité sugiere que el plan estratégico debería tener un horizonte móvil de tres años y demanda un organismo coordinador para toda la planificación estratégica.“Un progreso significativo exigirá importantes cambios estructurales para la Iglesia Episcopal como un todo”, dijo el comité, añadiendo que esta declaración “no refleja la opinión” del Comité de Gobierno y Administración para la Misión del Consejo Ejecutivo o de todo el Consejo.Por consiguiente el comité propone en su Resolución A155 (Ciclo continuo de planificación estratégica y supervisión) que la Convención ratifique el Plan Estratégico “como un documento de trabajo” y que se use como modelo para la Iglesia como un todo y no sólo para el Consejo Ejecutivo del centro denominacional.La resolución haría que la Convención estableciera una Comisión Permanente sobre Planificación Estratégica “para apoyar un proceso móvil de planificación estratégica de tres años” para la Iglesia y para el cual los CCAB informarían anualmente sobre sus propios planes estratégicos. La resolución también exigiría que las actividades de planificación de los CCAB y de la Convención General “se alinearan con el proceso estratégico de la Iglesia Episcopal”. Las provincias, las diócesis y las congregaciones serían alentadas a usar el proceso de planificación estratégica como un modelo. También serían alentados a proporcionar planes y actualizaciones anuales a la nueva comisión permanente.La Convención General instruiría al Consejo y al PB&F a seguir el plan estratégico para “una futura planificación financiera y presupuestaria”.El informe comienza en la página 728.Las resoluciones A aún no aparecen en el sitio de las legislaciones de la Convención. Las resoluciones se publican cuando Jefferts Schori y Anderson las asignan a uno de los comités legislativos de la Convención.Aún pueden ser propuestas otras resoluciones relacionadas con los cambios estructurales. La fecha límite para presentar cualquier clase de resolución (A,B,C o D) es a las 5:00 P.M. (hora de verano del Este) del 6 de julio, el segundo día oficial de la Convención. Todas las resoluciones relacionadas con la estructura dadas a conocer hasta ahora han sido asignadas al comité legislativo sobre estructura y cualquier decisión sobre esas resoluciones comenzará en la Cámara de Diputados.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri.En inglés: http://bit.ly/IJHwyH Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Por Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted May 4, 2012 Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

El ministerio episcopal para los sordos continua su larga historia…

first_img Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Demografía cambiante
La Iglesia Episcopal tiene probablemente 25 iglesias para sordos hoy en día, la mayoría de ellas dirigidas por líderes laicos con discapacidades auditivas o sordos, dijo Stuart, presidente de la ECD.Hace años, había muchos más sacerdotes sordos porque “las oportunidades de empleo para los sordos se limitaban a cosas como maestros para sordos, predicadores, trabajos manuales”, dijo ella. “Ahora, en 2013, todo el mundo se ha hecho más inclusivo”. En la actualidad, las personas sordas “pueden llegar a ser todo lo que quieran”.La disminución de sacerdotes sordos también refleja las tendencias culturales en general, agregó. “Sucede lo mismo en las iglesias para audientes.  Hay muchos menos jóvenes que se encaminan al sacerdocio”.La comunidad de sordos también se está reduciendo, dijo el obispo Philip Duncan de la Diócesis de la Costa del Golfo Central, que incluye la iglesia de San Marcos para Sordos [St. Mark’s Church for the Deaf] en Mobile. “Algunas de las cosas que no podían curarse, ahora pueden cambiarse para permitir que las personas oigan, con el implante coclear y cosas semejantes”.El padre de Stuart fue sacerdote a cargo de San Marcos. Después de su muerte en 2011, no apareció ningún otro sacerdote que dominara el lenguaje de signos para servir a la congregación de sordos, localizada a 613 kilómetros de Birmingham. “Yo estoy más cerca y podría ir hasta allí, pero no podría ir muy a menudo”, agregó.Luego Duncan participó en un oficio en el que recibió a un hombre en el seno de la Iglesia Episcopal a través de una conexión de vídeo a larga distancia. El hombre había sido movilizado recientemente por las Fuerzas Armadas. “Podíamos verlo, él nos podía ver”, recordó el obispo. “Nosotros le teníamos en una gran pantalla, y todo el mundo en la congregación miraba, y fue sencillamente fabuloso”.Esa experiencia inspiró el lanzamiento de similares transmisiones semanales en vivo desde la iglesia de Stuart, para facilitar que San Marcos y otras iglesias de sordos participaran de la eucaristía. Las iglesias distantes reciben el vídeo a través de una computadora portátil y lo proyectan en una pantalla en el santuario.“La idea es que, cuando estemos en el oficio… resulte lo mismo que si estuvieras sentado conmigo en los bancos de San Juan”, dijo Stuart. “Decimos las oraciones juntos”. A diferencia de ver pasivamente una transmisión televisiva, los feligreses participan deteniendo el mecanismo de la transmisión en vivo y leyendo las lecciones del día por sí mismos. “Cuando llegamos al Evangelio, ellos se vuelven a integrar”, explicó Stuart. “Yo leo el Evangelio, les doy el sermón. Y luego ellos todos se unen en el Credo Niceno… Voy despacio y doy instrucciones respecto a lo que sigue”.Cuando llega el momento de dar la Comunión, los ministros laicos de la eucaristía en las iglesias de sordos locales usan pan y vino presantificado, agregó Stuart.Hasta ahora, cuatro iglesias, incluida la de Santa Ana, han usado los servicios sustitutos, ya sea de manera regular o intermitente.La congregación de Santa Ana se reunió por primera vez en la Universidad de Nueva York en 1852 y en la actualidad adora en la capilla inferior de la iglesia episcopal de San Jorge [St. George’s] en Nueva York. “Atrae a sordos, sordos ciegos, personas con discapacidades auditivas o de otras clases, así como individuos que oyen normalmente provenientes de otras comunidades, entre ellos estudiantes universitarios interesados en aprender acerca de la cultura de los sordos y en participar de nuestra Santa Eucaristía”, dijo Evelyn Schafer, ministra laica de la eucaristía y líder de culto, que es sorda, en una entrevista por correo electrónico.“Tal como el Rdo. Thomas Gallaudet nos enseñó, acogemos a todos el mundo. Nuestros feligreses responden a toda una variedad de orígenes, étnicos, socioeconómicos, lingüísticos y culturales; esto nos hace muy diversos en nuestro ministerio. Cualquier domingo uno puede esperar entre 15 y 25 o más participantes. Después del oficio ofrecemos un almuerzo caliente, ya que muchas personas sordas viajan desde lejos en el área metropolitana para asistir a los oficios”.La anterior sacerdote de Santa Ana, la Rda. María Santiviago, se jubiló en 2011. Un sacerdote suplente sordo, el Rdo. William Erich Krengel, de Connecticut, predica ahora una o dos veces al mes y oficia valiéndose de la voz y de lenguaje de signos. Los otros domingos, la iglesia usa el DVD de Stuart o una transmisión en vivo vía Internet, o ambas cosas, dijo Schafer, uno de los dos líderes laicos de la congregación. “El uso del DVD ha sido una bendición. La transmisión en vivo tiene algunos problemas técnicos que deben resolverse”.La congregación también celebra un creciente número de oficios conjuntos, utilizando interpretación en el lenguaje de signos americano (ASL, por su sigla en inglés) en su parroquia anfitriona del Calvario-San Jorge [Calvary-St. George’s] y en la catedral de San Juan el Teólogo [Cathedral of St. John the Divine], dijo Schafer.La iglesia episcopal de San Bernabé para Sordos [St. Barnabas Episcopal Church of the Deaf], una misión que iniciara Thomas Gaullaudet en la Diócesis Episcopal de Washington, también ha usado el vídeo en vivo, pero no con frecuencia, porque los oficios se transmiten a las 11:00 A.M., pero en la costa oriental los oficios suelen ser a las 10:00 A.M., dijo Thomas Hattaway, ministro autorizado de la eucaristía. Él, que ha estado sordo desde que tenía 18 meses, se comunicó por teléfono a través de un intérprete, con quien estaba conectado vía videófono.La iglesia cuenta con unos 40 miembros, de los cuales de 10 a 15 asisten como promedio los domingos, reuniéndose en la capilla de San Juan de Norwood [St. John’s Norwood] in Chevy Chase, Maryland, dijo él. Al igual que Santa Ana, San Bernabé está repartido entre varios sacerdotes, y Hattaway y otros dos ministros laicos dirigen la congregación. A veces tienen la visita de predicadores invitados —incluidos ministros luteranos.Hattaway hace algunas visitas pastorales. “En el pasado, sí tuvimos intérpretes que venían e interpretaban para las personas que eran sordas y ciegas”, dijo. La iglesia también tenía un ministerio de los niños. “Sin contar con un sacerdote en el lugar, todo ha quedado de algún modo en suspenso en este momento”.Santa Ana, que la Diócesis de Nueva York estaba contemplando cerrar antes de que Santiviago llegara en 2007, sigue teniendo una variedad de ministerios además de los oficios del domingo, dijo Schafer. Un ministerio de participación comunitaria los jueves brinda la oportunidad de socializar.“Algunos de nuestros feligreses son personas sin hogar, desempleados y solitarios”, apuntó. “A fin de ayudarlos a desarrollarse, necesitan motivación y aliento. En consecuencia, hemos expandido nuestro programa de los jueves para que nuestros feligreses participen de varios programas sociales y educativos dentro y fuera de la comunidad”.Una estudiante del Seminario Teológico General, la diácona Arlette Benoit, dirigió recientemente las clases bíblicas de la iglesia, que ella ha elegido como el lugar donde oficiará su primer servicio después de ser ordenada al presbiterado. Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 En la foto con el Rdo. Henry Buzzard, sentado, aparecen (de izquierda a derecha) la líder laica Melissa Inniss, el obispo de Nueva York Andrew Dietsche y la líder laica Evelyn Schafer en la iglesia de Santa Ana para Sordos. Buzzard, que acababa de celebrar su 90º. Cumpleaños, es sacerdote jubilado de Santa Ana y fue el primer sacerdote sordo y ciego en Estados Unidos. Él es uno de los autores de Thomas Gallaudet Apostle to the Deaf  [Thomas Gallaudet, apóstol de los sordos]. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group “La Iglesia Episcopal comenzó a ministrar a personas sordas hace más de 150 años, cuando el Rdo. Thomas Gallaudet inició sus oficios en lenguaje de signos en la ciudad de Nueva York en 1852”, informa la página web de la Conferencia Episcopal de los Sordos [ECD, sigla en inglés]. Gallaudet inauguró la iglesia de Santa Ana para Sordos [St. Ann’s Church for the Deaf] —que se cree haya sido la primer iglesia de sordos de cualquier denominación— y organizó otras congregaciones episcopales para sordos a través del país.La Iglesia Episcopal fue también la primera denominación en ordenar a una persona sorda —el Rdo. Henry Winter Syle en 1876, según la página web. Él y Gallaudet comparten un día festivo (el 27 de agosto) en el calendario episcopal.El padre de Gallaudet, Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, “fue el primero en introducir en Estados Unidos el lenguaje de signos y la idea de la educación para sordos”, señaló Stuart. Y su hermano, Edward Miner Gallaudet, “fundó el Gallaudet College, Universidad de Gallaudet en la actualidad, con apoyo congresional y la firma de Abraham Lincoln en 1864. Esta es la única universidad de humanidades en todo el mundo dedicada específicamente a la educación de sordos”. Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Por Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 15, 2013 center_img Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID El ministerio episcopal para los sordos continua su larga historia de servicio por nuevas vías Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN La Rda. Cathy Deats canta y se comunica por signos durante la eucaristía del 10 de julio en la Convención General de 2009, a la que asistió como diputada por primera vez. Durante una convención anterior, ella sirvió como intérprete voluntaria de lenguaje de signos. Su iglesia, Santiago Apóstol [St. James’] en Hackettstown, Nueva Jersey, es el centro del programa del ministerio de los sordos de la Diócesis de Newark. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.[Episcopal News Service] Cuando la Rda. Marianne Stuart celebra la eucaristía el domingo por la mañana en Birmingham, Alabama, sus feligreses pueden estar en los bancos a unas cuantas horas al sur, en Mobile, o a más de un día de viaje por carretera en Nueva York.Hija audiente de padres sordos, Stuart, se comunica, al mismo tiempo, verbalmente y a través de un lenguaje de signos en los oficios que preside como rectora de la iglesia episcopal de San Juan para Sordos [St. John’s Episcopal Church for the Deaf] en la Diócesis de Alabama. Sus eucaristías semanales se transmiten “en vivo” por la Internet valiéndose de Skype para facilitarle a episcopales en congregaciones de sordos sin sacerdotes que participen del oficio en sus propios lugares y reciban el pan y el vino de los sacramentos reservados de las parroquias locales. Stuart también envía DVDs del próximo evangelio y sermón de cada semana a unas treinta direcciones —principalmente a individuos, pero también a un puñado de iglesias que las usan durante la oración Matutina y a una mujer que usa el Evangelio para un estudio bíblico para sordos en Carolina del Norte. En otros sitios, iglesias episcopales como la de Santiago Apóstol [St. James’] en Hackettstown, Nueva Jersey, ofrecen interpretación de lenguaje de signos en sus oficios.Todo es parte de un esfuerzo por ministrar las necesidades espirituales de los sordos y de personas con discapacidades auditivas y constituye la última encarnación de la larga historia del ministerio de los sordos en la Iglesia Episcopal. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Servicios de interpretación de lenguaje de signos
Si bien no todas las diócesis tienen iglesias de sordos, algunas congregaciones a través de la Iglesia ofrecen servicios de interpretación en lenguaje de signos americano (ASL). La Conferencia Episcopal de Sordos (ECD) proporciona financiación hasta por tres años para ayudar a las congregaciones a establecer servicios de interpretación y también ofrece subvenciones para pagar salarios de clérigos de media jornada o para ayudar a seminaristas sordos, dijo Stuart. La ECD recibe ayuda económica de la Iglesia Episcopal —$24.000 a lo largo del presente trienio— y también se sostiene con legados y donaciones, explicó.El ministerio de los sordos de la Diócesis de Newark tiene su sede en la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James’ Episcopal Church] en Hackettstown, Nueva Jersey, que ofrece interpretación de lenguaje de signos en todos sus oficios y actividades. La Rda. Sheila Shuford, diácona de la iglesia, es sorda, y la rectora, Rda. Cathy Deats, es intérprete [de lenguaje de signos] y tiene discapacidad auditiva.“Prestamos fundamentalmente servicios de información y referencia”, dijo Deats. En 2012, el ministerio informó a la convención diocesana que sus empeños comunitarios incluían seis meses de servicios de capellanía para pacientes sordos en un hospital psiquiátrico, la mentoría de un postulante al diaconado que estaba contemplando el ministerio de los sordos y el ofrecer servicios de interpretación [de lenguaje de signos] de emergencia al hospital de Hackettstown.Según el informe, el 17 por ciento de los estadounidenses adultos —36 millones de personas— presentan pérdida de la audición en alguna medida. “La discapacidad auditiva y la sordera tardía (el volverse sordo de adulto) constituyen la inmensa mayoría de las personas con pérdida de audición que encontrarán nuestras iglesias”.Por haber experimentado pérdida de audición, Deats, que ha trabajado como intérprete y como diputada en la Convención General, y como intérprete de signos en los eventos diocesanos, comprende la frustración de intentar seguir lo que se dice. “La gente no se da cuenta. No se trata del volumen. Es el tamaño del salón. Es el ruido de fondo”. El usar un aparato para ayudar a oír puede significar “que uno no pueda oír nada que no salga por un micrófono”.Pero las personas en una reunión pueden ignorar las repetidas peticiones de usar el micrófono o de repetir una pregunta.“En algún momento, te das por vencida”. “Después de un rato, dices, ‘entenderé lo que pueda, y tal vez me lo piense dos veces antes de asistir a una reunión como ésa’, porque resulta frustrante, y no quieres ser la única —ah otra vez esa latosa… que siempre está mencionando los micrófonos”.En la defensa de la existencia de las iglesias para sordos “hay numerosas personas sordas que temen que su cultura de sordera y lenguaje de signos llegue a perderse. Comparto el temor acerca de la lengua de signos”, dijo Deats. Pero ella cree también que existe una tremenda oportunidad misional en llegar a aquellos que presentan alguna discapacidad auditiva.“Hay una inmensa población de individuos con discapacidad auditiva”, afirma. “No puedo creer que no podamos incluirlos en algún tipo de labor de alcance comunitario… Cada vez afecta a mayor número de personas. Todos vamos por ese camino, gústenos o no: si uno llega a ser lo bastante viejo no va a oír tan bien”.Y añadió: “en verdad respeto a una persona sorda que quiere estar en un culto donde no tiene que mirar a un intérprete. Creo que debe haber una liturgia para los sordos, no me cabe duda”.Con un oficio interpretado, dijo Deats, “tienes que mirar constantemente” y prestarle atención tanto a la persona que habla como al intérprete. “Luego están las lecturas responsoriales. Leemos los salmos a toda carrera, y eso es casi imposible de seguir para una persona sorda que esté participando, mientras que un oficio para sordos puede encontrar un acomodo a esa necesidad”.Hattaway ayudó a una iglesia en Florida que tenía un intérprete y ahora ayuda en San Bernabé, en el área de Washington, D.C. Él se siente cómodo lo mismo con un intérprete que con un oficio en lenguaje de signos, afirmó. “Es lo mismo, de cualquier manera”.Pero Schafer dijo que ella se siente más cómoda en Santa Ana. “En una iglesia de sordos, los sermones son más breves y en consecuencia la vista se fatiga menos. Me siento más conectada con el sacerdote cuando el nos invita a hacer preguntas después de su sermón. En una iglesia normal, existe una distancia física mayor entre el sacerdote y yo. Y también, aunque los intérpretes son útiles y necesarios, crean una barrera invisible entre una persona sorda y el sacerdote”.“Crecí en un mundo audiente esforzándome por entender y aprender acerca de mi fe cristiana en una iglesia audiente”, dijo. Asistí a oficios normales, estudié en las clases bíblicas, fui confirmada, pero no oía a mis ministros ni a mis maestros. Dependía de la lectura de libros para educarme por mí misma. También dependía de mi familia, especialmente de mi amorosa madre que se tomó el tiempo adicional para ayudarme en mi desarrollo religioso y educativo”.En la actualidad, ella siente que tiene lo mejor de ambas iglesias: Santa Ana y El Calvario-San Jorge, la iglesia audiente que los apoyó y que a veces comparte el culto con ellos.Y ella valora la historia de su iglesia, como la primera iglesia para sordos de Estados Unidos. “Disfruto en compartir la historia de Santa Ana con personas de todas partes del país y del mundo. Puedo compartir plenamente mi fe con otros sordos y con personas que oyen por igual”.– Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de ENS. Las iglesias e individuos interesados en obtener mayor información acerca de los oficios por DVD o por transmisiones a través de Internet desde San Juan pueden dirigirse a Marianne Stuart en [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

Se anuncian los nominados para Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia…

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [1 de mayo del 2015] Los nominados para el 27º Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal se han anunciado en un informe publicado por el Comité Conjunto de Nominaciones para la Elección del Obispo Presidente (JNCPB). El informe, presentado en el Libro Azul, está disponible aquíEl 27º Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal será elegido el sábado 27 de junio durante la 78a Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal, que se celebrará del 25 de junio al 3 de julio en el Centro de Convenciones Salt Palace, en Salt Lake City, UT (Diócesis de Utah).NominadosLos nominados para Obispo Presidente son:El Rvdmo. Thomas E. Breidenthal, Obispo de la Diócesis del Sur de OhioEl Rvdmo. Michael B. Curry, Obispo de la Diócesis de Carolina del NorteEl Rvdmo. Ian T. Douglas, Obispo de la Diócesis de ConnecticutEl Rvdmo. Dabney T. Smith, Obispo de la Diócesis del Sudoeste de FloridaProcesoEl sábado, 27 de junio, miembros de la Cámara de los Obispos con asiento, voz y voto se reunirán en la catedral de San Marcos, en Salt Lake City, donde se producirá la elección en el contexto de oración y reflexión. Una vez que una elección haya tenido lugar, la actual Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori enviará una delegación a la Cámara de los Diputados para la confirmación de la elección.La Revda. Gay Jennings, Presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados, referirá el nombre al comité legislativo sobre la confirmación del Obispo Presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados sin anunciar el nombre a la Cámara en pleno. El comité legislativo hará una recomendación a la Cámara de los Diputados ya sea para confirmar la elección o no confirmarla, y la Cámara de los Diputados votará inmediatamente sobre la recomendación. La Presidente Jennings nombrará entonces una delegación de la Cámara de los Diputados para notificar a la Cámara de los Obispos sobre la acción tomada.El Obispo Presidente sirve por un período de nueve años. El Obispo Presidente es el Primado y Pastor Principal de la Iglesia, el Presidente del Consejo Ejecutivo, y el Presidente de la Sociedad Misionera Doméstica y Extranjera.Convención GeneralLa 78a Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal se celebrará del 25 de junio al 3 de julio, en Salt Lake City, UT (Diócesis de Utah). La Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal se celebra cada tres años, y es el órgano de gobierno bicameral de la Iglesia. Se compone de la Cámara de los Obispos, con más de 200 obispos activos y jubilados, y la Cámara de los Diputados, con clérigos y laicos diputados electos de las 108 diócesis y tres áreas regionales de la Iglesia, a más de 800 miembros. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Elections, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Maria Griselda Delgado says: May 2, 2015 at 1:33 pm Oramos por la Convencion General en especial por la eleccion de Obispo Presidente.Que El Espiritu Santo sople favorablemente sobre el proceso que se ha de llevar a cabo.Quien sea elegido, sea bendecido en el Ministerio y la gran responsabilidad que tendrá en los proximos años. Paz y salud Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention, Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (1) Featured Events General Convention 2015, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Posted May 1, 2015 Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Se anuncian los nominados para Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET House of Bishops, Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury’s Christmas 2015 sermon

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Dan Krutz says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release December 26, 2015 at 12:26 pm I appreciated the perspective of how the original characters like Herod and the Shepherds as well as all of us in history and now the the present are defined by our response to Jesus and His birth. Also, the use of apocalypse, revelation or uncovering to describe God’s action and purposes in our world today was helpful to me in finding meaning for this ancient story in the year 2015. Thank you, Archbishop Welby! Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York December 29, 2015 at 7:44 pm Wonderful sermon! Makes me proud to be an Anglican. Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (2) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Dec 25, 2015 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Archbishop of Canterbury’s Christmas 2015 sermon Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Archbishop of Canterbury Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Lambeth Palace] Read Archbishop Justin Welby’s Christmas sermon preached at Canterbury Cathedral this morning.At a Carol service last week I met Mary Berry. She was a delight, and it was a privilege to meet her. The conversation was going so well – I can bluff even when it comes to Bake Off – until the person next to me spoiled it ever so slightly by saying “Justin has never watched a single complete episode of Bake Off.”To give her credit she recovered very well. “Why not?” she asked. And I answered that although the cooking was fascinating to me, I could not stand the moment when people get sent home. They look brave, and hug and all that, but what a blow! In front of millions they are being defined as not quite having made the grade.None of us like being defined by others, but certain things mean that we cannot take part without accepting that the event will define us, even if only as having a soggy bottom on our cake. Participation will define us.In the events of Jesus birth, Herod and the shepherds are defined by their response to Jesus. Today, we are each defined by our response to Jesus. Even more extraordinarily, Christmas defines God. Here is the most startling of claims; this baby, this Jesus, who is God, defines God. God is self-defined as pure love, love celebrated in angel light and seen in human vulnerability, love that is indifferent to status, and that hates injustice, love the news of which is borne on the heavenly songs, but which is seen in poverty and insecurity.What the shepherds glimpsed that silent night outside Bethlehem was an apocalypse, which means an uncovering of God’s final purpose for all the universe.The shepherds were the poorest of the poor, out on cold hillsides day and night. They probably weren’t religious people. They certainly weren’t powerful, influential people. They were the butt of jokes, the object of contempt and the outsiders. They were unlikely to consider themselves on a journey in search of meaning and personal fulfilment.Yet to them the angels flew, not for private experience but for public declaration. They told of a once-for-all event that shifted the entire world, the whole creation. This event wasn’t just to be observed from far off, it was close, inviting, a God-for-them apocalypse, an event in which they are invited to participate. And they did.Today, across the Middle East, close to the area in which the angels announced God’s apocalypse, ISIS and others claim that this is the time of an apocalypse, an unveiling created of their own terrible ideas, one which is igniting a trail of fear, violence, hatred and determined oppression. Confident that these are the last days, using force and indescribable cruelty, they seem to welcome all opposition, certain that the warfare unleashed confirms that these are indeed the end times. They hate difference, whether it is Muslims who think differently, Yazidis or Christians, and because of them the Christians face elimination in the very region in which Christian faith began. This apocalypse is defined by themselves and heralded only by the angel of death.The shepherds see the truth, eternal, unwavering, divine truth, defined not by them, but by God: it was truth for them then, it is truth with us today. Goodness knows what they were expecting, but what they find is a new-born child – tiny, helpless and vulnerable. Yet they bow down in worship. The shepherds get this apocalypse.Herod too gets this apocalypse. He senses that this tiny, helpless, vulnerable, utterly normal child is the ultimate threat to his power and authority. He is right: this child is the ultimate judge of all human power and authority. Having heard about the birth of Jesus, Herod responds in devastating destruction. He tries to annihilate the apocalypse of God. Force meets love, and love has to flee into Egypt and returns to ordinary life and eventually to a cross and an empty tomb, conquering the world. At Christmas we are confronted with God’s form of power, which judges all our forms of power.The powerful, by their response, define themselves. Isaiah addresses that very point in our Old Testament reading. We often skip the middle verses because they are uncomfortable sounds at Christmas. To the people of Israel, Isaiah was pointing to the destruction of their oppressors, to God’s defining judgement on those who brutalise the poor, who set a yoke of oppression. For as the poet-priest Malcolm Guite says,But every Herod dies, and comes alone/to stand before the Lamb upon the throne.To all who have been or are being dehumanised by the tyranny and cruelty of a Herod or an ISIS, a Herod of today, God’s judgement comes as good news, because it promises justice. As Isaiah makes clear, God’s judgement is one piece of a bigger story of salvation – God’s apocalypse of love – which declares, “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given”.To all Herods this innocent baby is a threat, a sign of God’s radical reimagining of power – through love.To the shepherds, he is a gift, and an invitation.Herod and the shepherds recognise the significance of this child, yet they respond very differently. We too are defined, by our response to this child. God allows us the freedom to reject him, or, in our own vulnerability, to kneel and worship the child who is given, the true apocalypse, who unveils God.Jesus sets the benchmark for God’s dealing with the tyranny and cruelty of our world, for He is the Prince of Peace. We do not deny tyranny and cruelty, we do not compete with it: rather, we overcome as we allow ourselves to be defined by God’s true unveiling, transformed by His invading love.It is this true apocalypse that we are confronted with at Christmas. It is news of God’s purposes for the world God made and sustains, purposes which are better than we can imagine. This apocalypse, this unveiling, judges every world power, reaches out to every displaced people group, every refugee, every single human heart. It begins with ourselves. Both our means and our ends must meet the standard God sets for us here.The shepherds went and worshipped. Herod sought to kill. Today’s Herods, ISIS and the like around the world in so many faiths, propose false apocalypses. But you and I are called to respond in worship and transforming, world changing obedience, both as individuals, and together, to this revelation of the baby that defines God, for it is our response to Jesus that defines us. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more