Rep Lizzie Fletcher Discusses Mueller Report Impeachment And Her First Bill

first_imgHouston Congresswoman Lizzie Fletcher was one of just two Democrats to flip a GOP-held Texas congressional seat in 2018. Now, she’s completed her first 100 days in office, she’s preparing to file her first bill, she’s held some town halls across the district, and she’s even picked up a challenger for 2020, along with another potential challenger from the Bush family.In the audio above, Rep. Fletcher joins Houston Matters host Craig Cohen to talk about her tenure so far and to answer listener questions. Here are some highlights from that conversation:ON THE MUELLER REPORT:Regarding whether Congress should consider if any of Pres. Donald Trump’s actions as outlined in the report rose to the level of obstruction of justice, Rep. Fletcher said the American people deserve to know the truth.  “I think that we deserve to know the facts, and we want to know what happened,” she said. “And I think that we’re entitled to that. So, Congress needs to look at that.”She added that Congress needs to address the one, unequivocal finding in the report: that Russians interfered with the 2016 election.“If we can’t ensure the sanctity of our electoral process and make sure that our elections are free from interference from from foreign powers, we will be in a much worse place,” Fletcher said.Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz/Houston Public MediaCongresswoman Lizzie Fletcher.ON POSSIBLE IMPEACHMENT:A handful of House Democrats seem to see the Mueller report as enough evidence to begin impeachment proceedings against Pres. Trump, while others — such as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi –have urged more caution. Where on that spectrum does Fletcher fall? She said she still wants to know more information.“Certainly the Mueller report has presented a lot of facts,” she said. “But we need to see the underlying documents, and frankly we need to see the full un-redacted report to be able to reach certain judgments.”ON HER FIRST PIECE OF LEGISLATION:Fletcher says “very soon” she’ll introduce her first bill, a bi-partisan measure related to flood prevention.“That’s designed to make sure that we can move ahead on some of these flooding mitigation projects and cut out some of the red tape that prevents local sponsors like Harris County Flood Control or the City of Houston from being able to proceed with projects and risk the possibility of losing federal funding,” she said. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz/Houston Public MediaHouston Matters host Craig Cohen in a previous interview with Rep. Lizzie Fletcher in February 2019.center_img X 00:00 /19:21 Sharelast_img read more

Researchers discover promising hydrogen storage material

first_img Copyright 2011 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. (PhysOrg.com) — If hydrogen is to ever to serve as an onboard energy carrier for the transportation industry, a material will be needed that can store large amounts of hydrogen at ambient temperature and pressure. So far, researchers have not found any material that can meet these requirements. But in a new study, a team from China and the US has taken a significant step toward this goal by identifying a material that can store hydrogen with a density as high as 4.6 wt. % (i.e., the hydrogen accounts for 4.6% of the total weight of the storage material), enabling it to meet the target of 4.3 wt. % set by the US department of Energy for 2010. More information: Kun Lü, et al. “Sc-phthalocyanine sheet: Promising material for hydrogen storage.” Applied Physics Letters 99, 163104 (2011). DOI:10.1063/1.3653465 Explore further Citation: Researchers discover promising hydrogen storage material (2011, November 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-hydrogen-storage-material.html Full to the brim with hydrogen: Porous form of magnesium borohydride can store hydrogen The researchers, led by Qiang Sun from Peking University in Beijing, China, and Virginia Commonwealth University in the Richmond, Virginia, US, have published their study in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.“Hydrogen storage is a big challenge for the hydrogen economy,” Sun told PhysOrg.com. “Currently the research is behind schedule, but with the advancement of materials design and synthesis, reaching the target for future transportation applications [is becoming] more and more promising.”As the researchers explained, the greatest difficulty in finding a sufficient hydrogen storage material for onboard storage systems lies in meeting multiple requirements with a single material. For example, in previous studies researchers have found that light metal hydrides can store hydrogen with a gravimetric density of 20 wt. %, but the material is not reversible, meaning it cannot be reused. Also, the hydrogen desorbs only at very high temperatures. In contrast, other materials such as carbon nanotubes and metal or covalent organic frameworks can store hydrogen reversibly, but the hydrogen adsorbs only at very low temperatures. The difference is due to bonding: in light metal hydrides, hydrogen is held in much stronger bonds than in the second group of materials. The researchers explain that, ideally, hydrogen should be bound with an intermediate binding energy.“If the bonding is too strong, hydrogen can only be released at high temperature, while if the bonding is too weak, the storage is unstable at room temperature,” Sun explained. “So we require an intermediate bonding energy.”In the current study, the researchers used modeling and simulations to investigate the performance of hydrogen storage in metal-containing porous sheets, which can be synthesized using the techniques previously proposed by two other groups (M. Abel, et al., and A. Sperl, et al.). In those techniques, porous sheets were made of blue-green dye units called phthalocyanines (Pc) with regularly spaced iron (Fe) atoms or other metal atoms. Due to their high dispersion, these metal sites in the porous substrates provide the possible adsorption sites for hydrogen molecules.“Transition metal atoms easily aggregate to form clusters,” Sun said. But materials in which metal atoms can be prevented from coalescing are scarce.The researchers systematically investigated 10 Pc-based porous sheets with transition metal atoms from scandium (Sc) through zinc (Zn), and found that porous Pc sheets with Sc atoms could store up to 4.6 wt. % hydrogen. In addition to the Sc atoms’ regular distribution in the Pc sheet, Sc has two other attractive features. First, it is lighter than other transition elements, allowing the overall storage material to be relatively light. Second, Sc atoms have a large size, so that they stick out and can capture more hydrogen molecules.By theoretically demonstrating that this Sc-Pc porous sheet can be used to create a hydrogen storage material with attractive properties, the researchers hope that the results will stimulate further analysis and experimental tests of the promising material. At a temperature of 298 K and pressure of 100 bar, the new hydrogen material can store hydrogen at a density of 4.6 wt. %. The inset shows the geometry of a Sc-Pc sheet. Image credit: Kun Lü, et al. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more